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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been going back and forth on how to set up my rear suspension. What are the advantages/disadvantages triangulated 4 links & dual triangulated 4 links. This is will see some road time so I want to be able to have a decent street ride still.
 

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Do whatever is easiest to package. Both can be very streetable. Bryce will tell you the handling and performance differences but in a Jeep you can only make things fit so far. If it was a buggy or something were you could build it to fit whatever style you need it would be a bigger decision.
 

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It doesn't matter, if you have a single triangulated and you change the paralell links by 1" they are now not paralell..... Package whatever fits and get the numbers right and don't worry about what to call it.

Usually lowers just inside the frame and then tapered outwards on the axle works easily. For uppers you can make the frame mounts almost right above the lower brackets (ie use the poly combo brackets, they work great.). And the put the upper axle mount 18" apart or as narrow as 6" or so.

Play with each pair of links angles to get a flat roll axis and then keep balancing everything out until everything is in-check.

Too much typing on the iPhone! :sonicjay:
 

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If you look at my build thread, you can see how I packaged mine. They are *almost* like a single triangulated. The lowers are splayed out about 4" to each side. It has a decent roll angle, etc.

Thats the biggest thing, theres more rear steer in single triangulated, but if you spread the lowers, you can negate that pretty much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I bought the brackets from Great Lakes offroad that weld to the bottom of the frame. With that set up I am limited on how low and how much up travel I will have. With it mocked up I still have about 5-6" of travel which should be plenty but I could get more if I triangulated the lowers.
 

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Thats the biggest thing, theres more rear steer in single triangulated, but if you spread the lowers, you can negate that pretty much.
That's not really true.... It all depends on the setup and how flat the links are. I would run triangulated lowers before uppers but to say one has more roll steer than the other is too vague to be a true statement.
 

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there are differences but there not significant if everything else is dialed in. in general dual triangulated links are stronger than single triangulated links in off camber, side loading, side impacts, etc. if the degree of triangulation is mirrored and or symetrical top and bottom then the side loading is shared equally between all eight joints, effectively making it twice as strong as a single (four joints). to go one more step, a pan hard bar is stonger than either because it controls the side load in the same axis its applied rather than back 30 some inches.

but - as stated above, its not a big deal if it dosent work with your frame or space constriants. its hard to get an ideal set up that dosent require ongoing tweeking, just leave room for adjustment on the uppers at the frame - that one you can feel :thumb:
 
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