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Fucking Zen as Shit
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16,122 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I wanted to build a kayak for my mom (well i'd also wanted to build myself a canoe for sometime), So i set out on that adventure.


I settled on a "Stitch and glue" style, and since this was my first go at this kind of building I ordered a full kit.

Stitch and Glue is a method using Marine plywood, in this case 4mm Okume, and using a couple of forms you "stitch" the panels together using brass wires.

Once the shape is set you use epoxy and such to hold the shape.


This is the first "Glue up" getting the side and bottom panels to length. Epoxy thickened with silica powder and then a piece of fiberglass cloth overlaid for strength.


 

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Fucking Zen as Shit
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16,122 Posts
Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Next up was assembling on to the forms. This part was sucky at times.
The stitches along the keel quite evident here.






then was flipping it over to add the side panels.








getting the bow and keel to form took soaking the panel ends with water, and then several clamps and swearing.



Also in this one, you can see the epoxy thickened with wood flour (very finely ground sawdust) thats been applies to all of the seams using a syringe.


 

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Fucking Zen as Shit
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16,122 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Here is reinforcing the joints even more making "filets"
More epoxy (3 gallons in total will be used on the project), thickened with wood flour until its as thick as peanut butter.

Green masking tape to help control some of the mess.




And then tape removed

 

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Fucking Zen as Shit
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16,122 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Fiberglass tape laid on all the seams, Sheet of fiberglass installed where one will sit, and layer of Epoxy brushed on all exposed wood surface.

 

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Fucking Zen as Shit
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16,122 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
With the inside to that point it was time to flip it over.
Here lots of work with a block plane, sandpaper, and rasp were used to smooth the surface.

After that it was time to lay on a fiberglass sheet and epoxy it into place.







 

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Fucking Zen as Shit
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16,122 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
After that cured it was flipping it over to install forms for the deck.
These were all hot glued in place.

Yes, the inside looks like ass and is all wavy. This will be fixed one i get the top done and can sand the inside an them apply a leveling coat of epoxy.



 

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Fucking Zen as Shit
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16,122 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
The deck is comprised of individual 3/4" wide cedar and walnut strips. They only come 8' long, so for my longer runs i had to cut 8:1 scarf joint to then glue together the lengths. I built a shooting board with the correct angle to be able to plane that joint into them.

And right now i'm awaiting the epoxy to cure the long sections together so i can begin the task of installing all of those one by one.








 

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Fucking Zen as Shit
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16,122 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Once i get the deck stripped, then it will get the underside covered in fiberglass mech and epoxy. While that is curing i can then sand and coat the interior, and then the bottom still needs 2 more coats of epoxy before it's done. Hence why you can still, very pronouncedly, see the fiber glass in spots.
 

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Unchained
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1,965 Posts
looks very nice, how much weight can one of these hold and how hard is it to learn if you're starting from new-b woodworking skills? I can build houses but I've never built cabinets or something like this, it looks like a fun project.
 

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Fucking Zen as Shit
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16,122 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
looks very nice, how much weight can one of these hold and how hard is it to learn if you're starting from new-b woodworking skills? I can build houses but I've never built cabinets or something like this, it looks like a fun project.


This one is rated for a 300# payload, if you move up to a 14' one (this is a 12) it's rated for 400# payload.



This could be a good starter for someone with few skills. The kit comes with the plywood parts and forms precut (i have a canoe to do next which i just have plans for).

There is some crafting to do to get all the line to fair up nice, but not too bad. If you choose to do a plywood deck vs the cedar stripped one that i'm doing it would made it a bit easier.
 

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skillicous
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12,844 Posts
Awesome. are you happy with the quality of the wood (fit and finish) or did you have to shave any of it to make it fit? Would you do the kit again second time around, or cut your own from plans?
 

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ginger greaser
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358 Posts
My boat is stitch and glue also. Not just limited to kayaks.
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