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Direct Drive FTW
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am naming this truck Edith because I have always liked the name.

Edith is a 1984 C30 with a 350, 465, and 14 bolt. I know it is not pretty and needs a lot of work. But, it is a good starting point in my book for what I plan on using it for. This thread will basically be a list of upgrades as stuff is needed.

I bought it Friday night and drove it almost 50 miles from Lansing to Middleville. The suspension is surprisingly comfy and does not have the hard rebound my last 1 ton was known for. The heavy steel bed might have a bit to do with that.

Edith has a sweet rear end. That snow came from Lansing.


When I picked it up it had been sitting for a few months and had air in the lines. So, me and the previous owner poured some break fluid in it till it would stop. Lot of air in the lines but I made it to the house. Manuals rock when you have 1/2 a pedal.


When I first seen this thing I planned right away to rebuild the 465 and get a new carburetor. But, after driving it the 465 shifts smooth and stays in gear. Someone pulled the choke plate off the carburetor before the previous owner got it. So, it was a bit of a pain to start and I was expecting accelerator pump and float issues. None of that happened the carburetor is a beast and accelerated great.

Stock engine bay nothing messed with or modified.





Pre BS hydroboost


Choke plate missing



I still had the choke issue though. I hit Craigslist Saturday and managed to find a carburetor off of a El Camino for $20. I tossed the dice on whether it would work or not but as soon as I seen it I knew it was the same model. I went home and tore off the choke plate and installed the one from the El Camino pumped the gas 3 times and turned the key. Fired right up and idled what feels like 1000. I let it idle for a minute then burped the throttle and it dropped down. Yes, fast idle is set and the thing needs no tuning.
Nice to know I have extra parts If i do need them though.

I still have a long list of junk to upgrade and replace. ie it has 16.5 trailer tires on the front, more air then fluid in the breaks, needs exhaust gaskets, no radio, passenger door glass needs the lock, the back of the bed wanders and so on.

But, it drives down the road great, shifts great, and with a 12x8 bed will allow me to pull my 5 ton axles, 5 53" tires, 2 quads, massive amount of wood, or whatever I see a need for.

I love these trucks and wont mind dumping a couple grand into this one to make it a sweet daily driver.

My sweet interior. Windshield is not cracked and has the antenna in the center.:woot:


Power windows: Nope
Power locks: Nope
Nice and simple and it just works.



The frame looks great throughout. But, I plan on doing something in the rear to hold the bed on a bit better as well as add some mud flaps.



The bed is held on right now with 4 of these massive U bolts in front of the axle. The Previous owner said he had them made for like $120 or so. They still let the rear of the bed wander a little though. I plan on leaving them in place and bolting some plate steel to the frame at the bolts in the picture to prevent and side motion.



I got new shiny mufflers up there. To bad who ever installed them did not bother to do the exhaust gaskets and doughnuts at the same time. You can see where the bed moved a bit within the 50 miles of driving. I did take 92nd from alto to whitneyville and enjoyed the ride despite the "rough road" causing my escort car to fall behind.


I need to plate/insure this thing some time this week and plan on driving it by next Monday.
 

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Direct Drive FTW
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2,463 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The breaks needed to be done. After looking at the stock setup I decided there needed to be a better way.





I searched a bit and found someone who was looking for someone with a dually to try out a Disc Break kit.



The hubs bearings and seals look great. I am going to simply leave them in place at this time. The gears did not have any chips or missing teeth.


Used the same bolts as stock


Went all old school installing the studs.


Clean without any slop(with other kits).


Needed to grind down the original break flange.


The bracket required a bit of grinding.


Clean.


Spring pack limited where I could install the caliper








The caliper required a good amount of grinding to fit the stock rims.






I shot it with some of this paint rated at like 250 degrees.


The studs have a thread or two past the lugs still.



End result looks good.

 

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skillicous
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12,844 Posts
i hope this doesnt delay the build of the buggy
 

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Direct Drive FTW
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2,463 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I hope this doesn't delay the build of the buggy
Classic F up there. I collected all the parts for a 350,3/4 ton axles, 35" tires, started building it, then decided to build it Bigger. The 472 and 5 tons will take quite a while to make happen. But, I feel it is a smarter move in the long run.
The buggy has it's own account that gets added to weekly. Narrowing the housing the right way and getting the wheels/tires that I want will take a while.
I have been working on other parts of it. I simply don't want to give updates until I have something significant.
I would prefer to stop talking about the "buggy" within this thread please.


Sweet. Will this be the tow rig?
This thing needs significant improvements before I will consider it reliable enough to pull anything behind it. The disc breaks were a upgrade I knew I would be doing eventually. It is more for ease of maintenance then stopping power.
 

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Registered
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5,157 Posts
Sorry to bring up the buggy. But you should make this flat bed capable of hauling the buggy on top of the flatbed . That way your not having to tow a trailer.
 

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Direct Drive FTW
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2,463 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The calipers were sticking and I imagine it had to do with the fact I may have bent the pins. For $30 it was not worth messing with and I got a new set of calipers, bolted them up, and painted them with some high temp header paint.

Hard to see but I removed a good 1/8 of a inch more then before and slid the calipers back and forth many times to make sure there was no binding at all in the travel.



The good stuff


Here is my front caliper compared to my rear caliper. I will replace the calipers when I need new pads.



Pulled and replaced the spark plugs. I was a bit surprised they were all in the same condition considering the exhaust gasket is almost completely gone.



I ran the engine until it was hot, shooting the bolts with blaster, loosening them, then repeated.
That is the best way I found to remove exhaust bolts. The heat helps "suck" the oil into the flange. I was able to remove all the bolts without breaking any. It did take 3 cans of blaster and 4 hours to remove them.



I will be replacing with a one piece gasket. I do not have a good history with these.


I dug through the scrap pile and found something that might work as a mud flap. They wont get sucked back into the tire, are easy to replace, will bolt right up, and will not hold air like traditional flaps.
Good idea or bad idea?



I am replacing the power booster and doing the exhaust gaskets today. It did not make much sense to install a new booster with what I imagine is 30 year old lines. Napa, Berger, and a few others were useless. The only place that I found that would sell them is advanced auto. Not a stock item of course so I am waiting till they arrive at 930 then going to tackle this thing.
 

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Direct Drive FTW
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2,463 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Having no radio, cruise, or automatic junk in the way gave easy access to the two inner bolts. The 4 outer were also easy as heck to get to.


Here is why I went ahead and replaced the lines. Except for one return line which looked bran new. I just flushed and blew that out and installed new o rings on it.



This freaking nut that holds the boost unit to the backing plate had me scratching my head a bit. I ended up just using a air chisel by placing it on one side of the nut to loosen it then placing on the other side on the new unit to tighten it down. I don't know if it was the proper method. But, it worked very fast without any breakage and only a small notch that no one will see as a result.



Shiny new lines installed:




I cranked the truck over 20 or so times then fired it up. Cranked the wheel a few times, and hit the breaks a few times shutting it off to add fluid from time to time. I have used 1.5 quarts with no leaks.

The truck was really not much louder with the exhaust pulled back. It will be nice to drive this thing tomorrow once I install the gaskets and bleed out any remaining air in the steering system.

 

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Direct Drive FTW
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2,463 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Slapped the gaskets on and after a few warm ups and re-tightens I did a test drive to a hardware store 20 miles away.

Edith just fits between the lines.



I spent all of $8 on some "mudflaps", shot them with some paint leaving a small area to be shot with clear.



Kind of hard to see but the thing is 27" wide, sits 9" off the ground, and is bolted to the bed. The rear spring retainer keeps it from moving towards the wheel and the light bracket keeps it moving back.

 

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Direct Drive FTW
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2,463 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
I finally got around to keeping the back of the bed in place.

I made an angular support from the frame to the bed out of 2"x3/16 angle iron is facing inward. Then I used some 3" C channel I had laying around. It conveniently was the same height as the wood the previous owner had in place.
I placed the C channel parallel to the frame rails and faced it outward notching it tight against the Angle iron. Then I used another piece of the 3" C channel notching it between the other C channel sections and angular sections to form a bumper.

The whole thing gives great support without taking up much space or blocking my tail lights.

 

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Direct Drive FTW
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2,463 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I replaced the old starter with a new one. I flushed the brown radiator fluid out replacing it with green and did the heater hoses at the same time.
I had a small leak coming out of the upper gasket on this little bugger so I began tearing into my exhaust again.


I saved 2 of the 6 studs then needed to drill out the remaining pieces. I reused the manifolds and stock style exhaust for now.



Once I had the front all buttoned up I found that Edith was still to loud for my taste. So I stuffed a pair of 22" Walker quiet flow's (grandma car mufflers) behind the current free flowing mufflers. I plan on installing a tool box on the passenger side about as long as the fuel tank. Once that is done I will head to a exhaust shop to have the rest of the exhaust bent up.

They tuck up into the frame very nice.




Not viewable from the drivers side.


The passenger side can be seen just a bit for now. Once I build or find a tool box it will be out of sight.


I plan on using this space between the bed and frame later on so I made sure to keep the exhaust as far away from it as possible.


The current paint job on this thing can best be described as "white wash". I know the floors are gone and such so I really have not paid attention to the body at this point. I noticed this for the first time yesterday and thought it was a interesting for a 350. Although it does explain the factory 16.5's on the front. I have bent enough axle shafts in the past due to overloading to know to stay away from GVW's. This truck will spend most of it's time unloaded. When loaded it generally won't be seen traveling down any populated road or exceeding 45mph.

 

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Direct Drive FTW
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2,463 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
This 350 long block has been collecting dust for about 2 years now. The current stock engine in Edith smokes a bit when it first fires up then it stops. But, this thing is really low mileage and is built for torque. I figured I might as well get the swap done while I have an extra car to drive to work with.


After 3 hours







The plan for tomorrow is to remove the fan, remove the shifter, cut the junk fuel hoses, pull the spark plugs, remove the transmission mount bolt, put the trans on a dolly, remove the engine mount bolts, shimmy the engine to the passenger side removing the manual linkage without messing with the adjustment, rock the engine back and forth working it out of the manifolds, then begin transferring parts from the old engine to the new one. I am avoid replacing parts because the fuel pump, water pump, alternator, clutch, etc all work and I am trying to keep this swap under $500.
 

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Direct Drive FTW
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2,463 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Turns out my transmission cross member has 8 bolts.



I pulled the engine out and started playing around positioning it so pulling the transmission would be easy.



After a few taps the sm-465 was sitting by the alignment pins. I pulled up on the top of the trans and it slid right out. Later I installed a second strap so it could be pushed around.





The back of the engine has a good amount of oil left on it. They seemed to have repaired it because the thing never left a mark when I parked it. It looks like the back of the valve covers leaked and they just repaired the covers without cleaning anything. The following pictures are the result. I have spent 2 hours already cleaning under the truck and will be relentless now that I have the engine out.





The clutch/flywheel are toast.



 

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Direct Drive FTW
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2,463 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Clutch kit, Flywheel, tons of gaskets, and a Carb.


Cleaning supplies.


2 hours of scrubbing left me with this.


Another hour to remove all the grease off the Sm465.


This is not going to work


This will though:


I stole it off of my pile of 465 bell housings. I forgot I a hydro one hiding in there. Maybe later I will switch it over.



465 is all ready to go. Now onto the engine.


After 2 hours I had the accessories off the old engine. I shot the brackets, pulleys, and other small parts with some flat black header paint.


The back of the block was not painted. Instead of just leaving it in rust I cleaned it up and hit the header paint also. I am "upgrading" to the HEI instead of the billet one that was on the engine. I will regret this during tuning. In the long run it will be worth it though.


Then I had an opps moment looking at the back of the block. Turns out this engine is a bit older then I first thought. Sure enough the orange one has the smaller hole flywheel.



 

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Premium Member
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That engine has a roller cam.....make sure you get the right dist. gear on it.

Also the newer (orange) motor requires an externally balanced flywheel.
 

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Direct Drive FTW
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2,463 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
That engine has a roller cam.....make sure you get the right dist. gear on it.

Also the newer (orange) motor requires an externally balanced flywheel.
Thank you.
I went with a 1992 c1500 with a sm465 for the flywheel which is externally balanced.
On the HEI. Thank you once again. I totally overlooked the flat tappet cam in the 84. Looks like I will be hitting the junk yard.

Everything all bolted up and torqued.



I highly recommend a pallet jack to anyone that moves engines around a lot. I picked this one up used for $75 and it has paid for itself a few times now.
The ablity to raise and lower the engine with high accuracy made sliding these two together a cinch. I tightened down the strap snug, turned the engine over a bit, and the input shaft slid right in.



I bolted up all the small things from the old engine I had left over.

 
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