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Simplify...
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Discussion Starter #1
My wife & I have been discussing a go-kart for our kids, but for the retail prices involved, I could build a scaled-down Jeep-like buggy/go-kart for the same price or less, and it would be much more versatile. I'd use an early CJ frame, narrow-track CJ axles, stock-sized tires, and a narrowed CJ cowl/hood/grill. My idea is that I'd make an automatic, with a t-case locked in low-range.

What motor/trans/t-case options would you suggest for light weight, and compact size?

Craig
 

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if i was building a small little rockcrawler/buggy/gokart thingy it would be sami drivetrain and 31-32s.. reliable its foreign of course its reliable :D
 

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Simplify...
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Discussion Starter #7

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Kitten I'm gonna eat you!
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Don't you have another tug locked in low range?
 

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Simplify...
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Discussion Starter #11
Don't you have another tug locked in low range?
Yes, but I have other plans for the 2nd tug. I still have the t-case from the 1st one I did, though (locked in low). It'll bolt up to any New Process 23-spline output trans.

Craig
 

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Craig, look into a car engine + transaxle.

Myself, I'd go find a early 88-91 Honda civic with an auto. You will save yourselve several hundred pounds with this route.

Mount in north/south, and have the axleshafts welded into driveshafts, and run a rear offset axle to match the front (I'd go sami instead of CJ, but I'm guessing you have lots of parts).

With this setup, the transaxle becomes the transfer case with a set low range of whatever the axle gears are, which is around 3.5 to 4:1 in most of those cars.

It'll have plenty of power, very light (figure 300 lbs for a complete engine + trans on something like a civic or a geo metro or something), permanent low range. Honda engines are simple to work on and very reliable.

With that setup, Sami axles, you could be not much more than 1000 lbs.
 

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Craig, look into a car engine + transaxle.

Myself, I'd go find a early 88-91 Honda civic with an auto. You will save yourselve several hundred pounds with this route.

Mount in north/south, and have the axleshafts welded into driveshafts, and run a rear offset axle to match the front (I'd go sami instead of CJ, but I'm guessing you have lots of parts).

With this setup, the transaxle becomes the transfer case with a set low range of whatever the axle gears are, which is around 3.5 to 4:1 in most of those cars.

It'll have plenty of power, very light (figure 300 lbs for a complete engine + trans on something like a civic or a geo metro or something), permanent low range. Honda engines are simple to work on and very reliable.

With that setup, Sami axles, you could be not much more than 1000 lbs.
yep... nice honda motor and nice small sami axles woot..
 

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Simplify...
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Discussion Starter #14
Craig, look into a car engine + transaxle.

Myself, I'd go find a early 88-91 Honda civic with an auto. You will save yourselve several hundred pounds with this route.

Mount in north/south, and have the axleshafts welded into driveshafts, and run a rear offset axle to match the front (I'd go sami instead of CJ, but I'm guessing you have lots of parts).

With this setup, the transaxle becomes the transfer case with a set low range of whatever the axle gears are, which is around 3.5 to 4:1 in most of those cars.

It'll have plenty of power, very light (figure 300 lbs for a complete engine + trans on something like a civic or a geo metro or something), permanent low range. Honda engines are simple to work on and very reliable.

With that setup, Sami axles, you could be not much more than 1000 lbs.

Yes, I have lots of parts, but I'm completely open to other options (as suggested). I don't completely understand the transaxle setup you mentioned. I'm just not familiar with the terminology. I drove a '92 Civic for 10+ years, but it never required mechanical work outside of standard maintenance, so I never had to wrench on it.

This sounds like a good option if you can explain how it would keep the speed down by using the transaxle. I did some quick Google searches, but couldn't find a diagram for the transaxle setup.

Running an offset axle wouldn't be a big deal. I'm sure I could find a Quadratrac CJ pretty easily if I didn't go the Sami route.

Also, why the '88-'91 year range?

Craig
 

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Tube chassis with a big bore 4 stroke dirtbike engine (or other lightweight, compact engine) and long travel suspension.
 

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Craig,
I looked into this a few years ago,......I will send you the links.
Haggar is right with the Honda motor and trans.
You turned them sideways in the frame and run drive shafts where the axles would be.
The system I was looking at was using Ranger Axles. I also have a supplier for fiberglass bodies.
 

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I picked the 88-91 years because they are cheap and no OBD electronics. Any range would work. The later honda automatics get electronics that'd be more complicated.

As noted, you turn the engine sideways.

Thingk about this:

In a normal 4wd, you have an engine, then reduced by the transmission, then a transfer case, which reduces again. The output of the transmission is one shaft going forward, one going backwards.

Now, look at a fwd car. You have then engine, then its reduced by the transaxle. The transaxle also housing the differential which further reduces it. The output is a shaft going left and a shaft going right.

OK, so turn that car engine/transmission sideways, you now have an axleshaft going forward and one going backwards. Just like a normal 4wd arrangement. There's no transfer case, but the diffential in the transaxle acts like a permantent low range.

Look at these:

http://cyad.com/rhino_brochure.cfm

These use Honda CR-V or Acura integra motors, the run of the mill kind, not the pricy VTEC motors. These are plenty powerful for adults, so would rock for kids.


Actually, I've thought about building a buggy with a built honda motor myself, but I'd want to be hitting highway speeds in it without really revving the motor up so high...
 

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Affordable/reliable? I don't know much about them. How much do you think a beat-up but running donor vehicle would run?

Craig
You can find a sami for $500 and probly be a pretty decent rig for Mi.
Im with you on the go kart thing .You can buy a beat up truck or car (we used to can them winter beaters )for 5 bills.And that makes a way better Kart:sonicjay:
my first sami was 300 bucks ran like crap (bad valve) kids loved it .

Jeff
 
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