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Yooper In Training
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7,428 Posts
Left leg.
Hence keeping the two garden tractors I have. One has a parking brake on the left side, the othe has no left pedal and a right foot clutch.

Ironic that I used to joke that “automatic transmissions were for people without left feet”.
The brake/parking brake is still on the left on mine, and I believe nearly all compact/subcompact tractors, but with the hydrostatic trans I pretty rarely actually use it. Really only if I'm parking on a slope or doing precision loader work. It'd still be a concern though depending what you're able to do with a prosthetic(assuming you use a prosthetic).
 

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Desert Rat
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7,182 Posts
Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Smaller is definitely more navigable. They're also much lower and prone to underbody damage if working in the woods. BX series have a whole line of aftermarket skid plates for this exact reasons. Being lower should help stability a bit, but they're also fairly narrow. The bigger tires of the compacts also help ride quality quite a bit. They roll over things much easier. I still wouldn't say they ride well, but they beat you up less than the subcompacts.

For any of these tractors size is more an issue for transport than weight. My LX2610 with loader, bucket, mower, and back blade probably isn't even topping 3000lbs, but it does take up my whole 18ft trailer.
My car trailer is 18’ and 10k, so I think I’m good.
It may need fenders still from being borrowed by someone who “backs by Braille”, but it is a good trailer. I am surprised THAT only weighs 3k pounds.
All the compact and sub tractors look like they have a high center of gravity.

With my prosthetic I can push the park brake hard enough to set the lock on my lawn tractor.
 

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In Da Faaaaaace!!!
1988 YJ
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6,018 Posts
My brothers has the clutch on the right side. The engine RPM is a lever on the column. Transmission is automatic.

With forks I can JUUUUUUST lift a fully dressed cummins 12 valve on a skid.

I'm sure whatever you get you'll be happy. All size tractors have a use. I can get this one through the woods no problem as well.
 

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I'll Direc your TV
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8,876 Posts
Smaller is definitely more navigable. They're also much lower and prone to underbody damage if working in the woods. BX series have a whole line of aftermarket skid plates for this exact reasons. Being lower should help stability a bit, but they're also fairly narrow. The bigger tires of the compacts also help ride quality quite a bit. They roll over things much easier. I still wouldn't say they ride well, but they beat you up less than the subcompacts.

For any of these tractors size is more an issue for transport than weight. My LX2610 with loader, bucket, mower, and back blade probably isn't even topping 3000lbs, but it does take up my whole 18ft trailer.
Physical size was a big reason why I chose the L3901; I wanted to keep it smaller frame for navigating around our dense swamp property, and to be able to tow it with the trailer I had. It weights probably around 4,000/4,500lbs\, and just barley fits on my 16ft trailer, length wise. I would have preferred to go up to the L4701, however that was the bigger size frame and was nearly the same size as the tractor I had before; which defeated 50% of what I wanted in a new tractor.

I have yet to find any usability issues with it, in the beginning I had some issues with traction and getting it to do what I wanted and what not, but now that i've gotten time in the seat and experience I can do more, go more places with this one than I never could with old tractor. The "issues" were more than likely going from a large frame, gear shift, 50hp tractor with ag tires, to a small frame, hydrostat, 39hp with R4 tires. Big difference.

Would not change a thing or get a different purchase.
 

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Project Antitube
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1,079 Posts
So what size compact tractor are you looking for based on what you're trying to do with it?

I counted, I have more "tractors" than fingers and they're all 80s and older. They're all too small. The "biggest" one I have has a 75" wheelbase. I think the smallest I have is a 1963 Cub Cadet model 70 which is the size of a lawnmower. But it shares the same transmission as my 1947 Farmall Cub, which is significantly larger. I have a pile of Bolens garden tractors (subcompact), they're my favorite, especially the later large frame with the locking differential, mostly because they're indestructible. But they're only good for lifting a Dana 60 or a BBC at most and the biggest bucket I have is 54".

I nearly killed myself lifting an 8.5' Fisher commercial plow and frame with it and driving across my yard when I hit a raised tree root and it tipped. I ended up having to pull the bucket off to get the weight closer to the tractor and throwing some suitcase weights on the back (tires are already loaded and have kustom cast lead wheel weighs with truck drums as the mold). Then I switched to a different tractor to carry it the rest of the way. I like the Bolens because they have one pedal to control forward/reverse so I use left foot for "oh shit, hang on, what we hit", right foot for forward/reverse/brake, right hand to steer, left hand to run the controls.

Unless you're doing a lot of dirt work like tilling I don't think horsepower matters as much. I'm more interested in fluid flow rate vs pressure and what it can move without killing me.

None of my tractors are 4wd, but all of them have ag tires and either a locker or cutting brakes. I have gotten the Farmall Cub stuck in the woods a few times pulling a bottom plow to make ditches but I'm pretty sure 4wd would have just gotten me stuck "gooder". I'm pretty sure most of the modern 4wd compact tractors that are sub-40HP sit so low it'd be dragging the whole way through the paths I take with it anyway.

The small end of the "compact" tractor size is like 1000lb with the top end being around 60hp 4200lb tractor as far as I can tell from perusing websites.

They're also all different, even from the same company. Massey's cheaper tractors use a rocker pedal like the old Bolens. Their premium tractors don't, I was wondering if it had something to do with the fancy draft/limit/cruise control. Depending on the model, they often use different loaders which have different specifications like digging depth. A digging depth of 2" is lame. You can't even get under the grass roots to peel sod up.

I'm thinking the "small" end I'd find useful is a 2500-3000lb tractor. So something like a Kubota L3901 or Massey 1835M. You can get a backhoe for either of them that is "almost good enough" meaning it digs to 7' and change. If one were to go too big (Kubota Grand, Massey 2800 series) I think you'd be irritated with its usability and tearing up the lawn but you can lift 2500lb+ so I don't know. Maybe once I had a bigger tractor (something that can lift a real 2000lbs) I'd wish I'd gotten an even bigger one. But I don't think so, I don't live on a farm.
 

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Desert Rat
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7,182 Posts
Discussion Starter · #26 ·
There has been a ripple in the “The Force”.
My 1992 riding mower that has been my faithful steed for 18 years has come up lame. Could be something with a brake in the trans axle. It won’t back up without locking up, and drags going forward.
So, follow my logic, I am going out to buy a nice riding lawn mower. Something uncomplicated, simple yet comfortable that won’t break the bank. This will enable me to put the germangirl in the saddle on a newer “fun” machine so she can assume grass cutting duties. You know, like Tom Sawyer’s fence. If I buy the right riding mower, I think she will take over.
Those MAN hours can now be dedicated to “Man’s work”... or fishing.

Back on topic, on the tractor front, I‘m leaning toward a B model, in the 23hp flavor.
The 0% financing is tempting. If I pay it off in five years, with inflation, it could be worth damn near what I paid for it.
 

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I'll Direc your TV
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8,876 Posts
So what size compact tractor are you looking for based on what you're trying to do with it?

The small end of the "compact" tractor size is like 1000lb with the top end being around 60hp 4200lb tractor as far as I can tell from perusing websites.

I'm thinking the "small" end I'd find useful is a 2500-3000lb tractor. So something like a Kubota L3901 or Massey 1835M. You can get a backhoe for either of them that is "almost good enough" meaning it digs to 7' and change. If one were to go too big (Kubota Grand, Massey 2800 series) I think you'd be irritated with its usability and tearing up the lawn but you can lift 2500lb+ so I don't know. Maybe once I had a bigger tractor (something that can lift a real 2000lbs) I'd wish I'd gotten an even bigger one. But I don't think so, I don't live on a farm.
There's compact and sub-compact; sub-compacts would be the BX and B series for Kubota. I don't know models for other tractors. Compacts would be the L series, LX series Kubota's. Like my L3901. As you said seems like the general cutoff is about the 40hp mark; as I would not classify the L4701 as a compact tractor though it still might be considered one.

I find the BX series to be not very usefull as a tractor; Maybe if all you need to do is load buckets of mulch or similar I can see that purcahse, but as a utility tractor it's a waste of money IMO. I don't think they're geared for that kind of thing either. There the Big B tractors like the 26hp that you can get some better numbers on for loader capacity but nothing with a pto hp to run anything more than a finish mower.

Back on topic, on the tractor front, I‘m leaning toward a B model, in the 23hp flavor.
The 0% financing is tempting. If I pay it off in five years, with inflation, it could be worth damn near what I paid for it.
0% financing is going to be hard to beat anywhere. tractors and equipment are just going to keep going up in price in the next couple years; and they keep their value even without inflation. I know the B2301 is very popular. I would look at the LX2610 too personally; slightly smaller than the L2501, but bigger than the B series. Kind of like a Big B series tractor. Plus the LX2610 doesn't have the DPF system while still being tier 4 compliant. You can get a few more fancy options with the LX that you don't get in the L2501. Plus it still has the options for a belly mower.

Like I said, I went with the L3901 because I had a lot of ground engaging 3pt equipment that I needed the HP and PTO HP for, and the use was more utility than homeowner type work. I will say, that on every Kubota now, they all use a quick on/off system on their loaders that make it ridiculously easy and quick to take the whole loader off the tractor; not the swift-latch system (mentioned earlier I think)
 

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Kitten I'm gonna eat you!
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3,802 Posts
I highly recommend an orange B for mowing purposes. Here is mine, I used it to cut 2 acres of what should have been wet hay field.
Careful though 1st gear tends to be a bit high for heavy cutting and tends to want to stall. Never rolled it or got it stuck though.

280137
 

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Yooper In Training
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7,428 Posts
There's compact and sub-compact; sub-compacts would be the BX and B series for Kubota. I don't know models for other tractors. Compacts would be the L series, LX series Kubota's. Like my L3901. As you said seems like the general cutoff is about the 40hp mark; as I would not classify the L4701 as a compact tractor though it still might be considered one.

I find the BX series to be not very usefull as a tractor; Maybe if all you need to do is load buckets of mulch or similar I can see that purcahse, but as a utility tractor it's a waste of money IMO. I don't think they're geared for that kind of thing either. There the Big B tractors like the 26hp that you can get some better numbers on for loader capacity but nothing with a pto hp to run anything more than a finish mower.



0% financing is going to be hard to beat anywhere. tractors and equipment are just going to keep going up in price in the next couple years; and they keep their value even without inflation. I know the B2301 is very popular. I would look at the LX2610 too personally; slightly smaller than the L2501, but bigger than the B series. Kind of like a Big B series tractor. Plus the LX2610 doesn't have the DPF system while still being tier 4 compliant. You can get a few more fancy options with the LX that you don't get in the L2501. Plus it still has the options for a belly mower.

Like I said, I went with the L3901 because I had a lot of ground engaging 3pt equipment that I needed the HP and PTO HP for, and the use was more utility than homeowner type work. I will say, that on every Kubota now, they all use a quick on/off system on their loaders that make it ridiculously easy and quick to take the whole loader off the tractor; not the swift-latch system (mentioned earlier I think)
I'll expand on this a bit, though I agree with most of it.

The B is definitely considered a compact, not a subcompact. It's just on the low end of the compact, similar to a Deere 2025R(which is essentially just a 1025R with bigger tires). They changed the B2650 and B3350 to LX2610 and LX3310 so people would stop being confused between "big B" and "small B".

I agree the BX is basically a 4WD lawnmower for people who want a loader and/or baby backhoe. They're way beefier than low end mowers like you'd find at big box stores, but they're still fairly light duty compared to compacts. But their capabilities are still pretty underrated by most. They'll do some serious work. Still not what I'd get if you have a separate dedicated lawnmower. If you're set on a subcompact, the Deere 1025R beats the Kubota BXs in pretty much every category.

The B2301 and B2601 are smaller than LX, but also more basic. Stuff like tilt steering, fancy seat, quick attach bucket, etc are all optional on those where they're standard on the slightly bigger LX. And they're all pretty handy features, most dealers outfit them with at least some of those items, which really narrows the price gap between them. But there can definitely be advantages to the slight smaller B depending on your usage. If you were to mow with it, the ground contact deck on the LX does a much nicer job than the floating deck on the B. My yard is very uneven and even with a wider deck my LX mows much nicer and less scalping than the my previous machine.

Agreed the standard loader is plenty quick enough to install and remove. Like 2-5 minutes of work depending how many beers you've had. The swift-tach is marginally faster, but way more problematic. People have had them come off and do serious damage, and there were several recalls on it just this year. It's a solution in search of a problem. Standard loader is fine, but quick-attach bucket is a must(SSQA) rather than pinned. Also get the biggest bucket available for that model, which is a 54" for the B, 60" for LX. They call the bigger one a "light material bucket". In reality the construction is identical, they just let the lawyers name it so people can't blame them if they overload it. I've filled mine with clay and gravel with zero problems.

Rear ballast is a must. I was going to fab something up, but ended up buying a ballast box with the tractor and filled it with an additional 500lb of concrete and scrap steel. It's a game changer for both lift capacity and safety. I recently moved a stack of empty pallets without rear ballast and even that was pucker factor in my hilly yard. Loaded tires are also a great option, only reason I haven't done that is to minimize lawn damage when mowing. Might still do it eventually.

Good point on PTO power for ground engaging implements. Not much of a consideration for my use, but definitely is for some people.

I'd buy the B2601 over the B2301. The extra $900 or whatever it is will be worth it for the power, and even more worth it for resale if you ever get rid of it. Always best to get the most power available in that chassis size....except with the LX IMO. Stepping up to the LX3310 was a $3k+ upgrade and adds a bunch of complexity and emissions crap I don't want to be dealing with in 20+ years. And I didn't need the PTO power.

Shitty part is right now you might have a hard time finding a dealer with multiple models in stock to sit on and evaluate. Lots of places are on backorder right now, but MI dealerships seem to be a bit better than others I've seen online.
 

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I'll Direc your TV
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8,876 Posts
I'll expand on this a bit, though I agree with most of it.

The B is definitely considered a compact, not a subcompact. It's just on the low end of the compact, similar to a Deere 2025R(which is essentially just a 1025R with bigger tires). They changed the B2650 and B3350 to LX2610 and LX3310 so people would stop being confused between "big B" and "small B".

I agree the BX is basically a 4WD lawnmower for people who want a loader and/or baby backhoe. They're way beefier than low end mowers like you'd find at big box stores, but they're still fairly light duty compared to compacts. But their capabilities are still pretty underrated by most. They'll do some serious work. Still not what I'd get if you have a separate dedicated lawnmower. If you're set on a subcompact, the Deere 1025R beats the Kubota BXs in pretty much every category.

The B2301 and B2601 are smaller than LX, but also more basic. Stuff like tilt steering, fancy seat, quick attach bucket, etc are all optional on those where they're standard on the slightly bigger LX. And they're all pretty handy features, most dealers outfit them with at least some of those items, which really narrows the price gap between them. But there can definitely be advantages to the slight smaller B depending on your usage. If you were to mow with it, the ground contact deck on the LX does a much nicer job than the floating deck on the B. My yard is very uneven and even with a wider deck my LX mows much nicer and less scalping than the my previous machine.

Agreed the standard loader is plenty quick enough to install and remove. Like 2-5 minutes of work depending how many beers you've had. The swift-tach is marginally faster, but way more problematic. People have had them come off and do serious damage, and there were several recalls on it just this year. It's a solution in search of a problem. Standard loader is fine, but quick-attach bucket is a must(SSQA) rather than pinned. Also get the biggest bucket available for that model, which is a 54" for the B, 60" for LX. They call the bigger one a "light material bucket". In reality the construction is identical, they just let the lawyers name it so people can't blame them if they overload it. I've filled mine with clay and gravel with zero problems.

Rear ballast is a must. I was going to fab something up, but ended up buying a ballast box with the tractor and filled it with an additional 500lb of concrete and scrap steel. It's a game changer for both lift capacity and safety. I recently moved a stack of empty pallets without rear ballast and even that was pucker factor in my hilly yard. Loaded tires are also a great option, only reason I haven't done that is to minimize lawn damage when mowing. Might still do it eventually.

Good point on PTO power for ground engaging implements. Not much of a consideration for my use, but definitely is for some people.

I'd buy the B2601 over the B2301. The extra $900 or whatever it is will be worth it for the power, and even more worth it for resale if you ever get rid of it. Always best to get the most power available in that chassis size....except with the LX IMO. Stepping up to the LX3310 was a $3k+ upgrade and adds a bunch of complexity and emissions crap I don't want to be dealing with in 20+ years. And I didn't need the PTO power.

Shitty part is right now you might have a hard time finding a dealer with multiple models in stock to sit on and evaluate. Lots of places are on backorder right now, but MI dealerships seem to be a bit better than others I've seen online.

All really good info, expands more on what I was saying with actual points lol

Rear ballast is absolutely a necessity for any loader work; just the design of the system requires something more than just loaded tires to balance out the weight hanging however many feet out front of tractor. I usually have either the brush hog or box blade attached to the 3pt of the tractor cause one of those i'll generally be using anyway. Don't really need a shit load of weight, but something that's got some gravity to it.

We'll see in time about the DPF system on my tractor and how much it fawks off, if any. For now, I don't have any problems with it. If I were looking at a smaller tractor I would probably go with the LX more than the B series cause it's not that much bigger and you get more tractor for the money; if you're just talking engine HP you're missing out on a lot of the tractor; as said, you need to look at lift and hydraulic capacity. The L2501, L3301, and L3901 all have different HP but all have the same hydraulic power. If I didn't need the ground engaging HP/PTO HP, I probably would have went with an L2501 as it was cheaper and didn't have the emissions. It probably would have worked but it would be struggling with what I already had, plus I knew that I'd eventually have more tows to stack on it and the 25HP/19PTO HP would not have been enough for those plans.
 

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In Da Faaaaaace!!!
1988 YJ
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6,018 Posts
Great point on ballast box. I have one as well. But normally I just keep the box blade on the back and it’s heavy enough. I hate changing out 3 point things. Always takes forever to get it all lined up. Can also have tires filled with beat juice for added weight.
 

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Yooper In Training
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7,428 Posts
I like the ballast box because it doesn't have a huge swing like a lot of implements, so it's less of an issue for stuff like working in woods hauling logs.

I absolutely love my quick hitch. I bought the Harbor Freight unit to see if I liked the one piece style. It was only $80 with the discount, but it's pretty thin so I actually tried to break it with no luck so far. It's taken zero damage, even with a reciever welded to the thin Chineseum steel. I only have a few rear implements so it's easy to set them up for the same rear spacing but if I had lots of different pieces/sizes I'd get the much more flexible Pat's Quick Hitch system. They're all worth their weight in gold for hooking and unhooking implements. It takes me longer to get off the tractor and raise the kickstand for my back blade than it does to actually hook up to it.
 

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Yooper In Training
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All really good info, expands more on what I was saying with actual points lol

Rear ballast is absolutely a necessity for any loader work; just the design of the system requires something more than just loaded tires to balance out the weight hanging however many feet out front of tractor. I usually have either the brush hog or box blade attached to the 3pt of the tractor cause one of those i'll generally be using anyway. Don't really need a shit load of weight, but something that's got some gravity to it.

We'll see in time about the DPF system on my tractor and how much it fawks off, if any. For now, I don't have any problems with it. If I were looking at a smaller tractor I would probably go with the LX more than the B series cause it's not that much bigger and you get more tractor for the money; if you're just talking engine HP you're missing out on a lot of the tractor; as said, you need to look at lift and hydraulic capacity. The L2501, L3301, and L3901 all have different HP but all have the same hydraulic power. If I didn't need the ground engaging HP/PTO HP, I probably would have went with an L2501 as it was cheaper and didn't have the emissions. It probably would have worked but it would be struggling with what I already had, plus I knew that I'd eventually have more tows to stack on it and the 25HP/19PTO HP would not have been enough for those plans.
It's also worth noting that not all tractors with the same horsepower rating are created equal in usable power. The 26hp LX has more displacement than the 26hp small B, and it makes it at lower RPM with significantly more torque. I'd venture a guess that the L2501 makes a similar step up from the LX2610.
 

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XXXJ -
I'm probably only about 30 minutes north of you and have a 2014 L3800 4wd Kubota. If you would like, you are welcome to stop up some evening or weekend and take it for a spin. I have acreage with woods, meadows and trails to get a feel that you may not be able to get at a dealer. Once you have one, you look for things to do with it...you may never be the same again.
 

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F-U-CANCER!!!
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I like the ballast box because it doesn't have a huge swing like a lot of implements, so it's less of an issue for stuff like working in woods hauling logs.

I absolutely love my quick hitch. I bought the Harbor Freight unit to see if I liked the one piece style. It was only $80 with the discount, but it's pretty thin so I actually tried to break it with no luck so far. It's taken zero damage, even with a reciever welded to the thin Chineseum steel. I only have a few rear implements so it's easy to set them up for the same rear spacing but if I had lots of different pieces/sizes I'd get the much more flexible Pat's Quick Hitch system. They're all worth their weight in gold for hooking and unhooking implements. It takes me longer to get off the tractor and raise the kickstand for my back blade than it does to actually hook up to it.
I now feel like I have been living behind a rock. I had to google quick hitch to see what it was. Does this work on most 3 point tools? Would it work on a brush hog, backblade and a snowblower?

This is painfull to ask, since I grew up farming...... lol
 
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Project Antitube
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I use suitcase weights on a rack I built. You can get suitcase weighs for cheap at auction and just weld up a rack for the back. Nice thing is it keeps the weight tight and low, plus is easy to remove. Mine I have set up so to remove weight you just need to flip up the cover when it's on the tractor and pick up a weight, otherwise they just dangle. I try to have the least amount of weight on the back as possible because I don't like tearing up the grass and it "teeters" and bounces less. My "big" tractor has 28" rubber filled, plus another 600 of wheel weights, then I can put like another 600 or so on the back. The more I think about it, the more I suspect it's probably around 6,000lbs.

I think you need to go sit on some tractors. It's pretty easy to fall in love with the first one you sit on so make sure you pick a good one for the first one. The first new tractor I sat on was a Kubota L3901 I believe.

So, I've spent a lot of time looking at:
Kubota LX2610 HST
Kubota L3901 HST
Kubota L4060 HST
Kubota L4760 HST

Kioti CK2610 HST
Kioti DK4710SE HST

Massey 1825E HST
Massey 1835M HST
Massey 2850M HST

They seem to be best of breed for features and size/capability for the dollar of the brands I'd consider. They seem to get no complaints short of "I should have gotten a bigger tractor". I've been looking at getting a new tractor for so long the models have rolled over.

The problem is that you get way different features and whatnot with each, so it makes it difficult to compare. They're all considered "compact" tractors and they are way different in size and capacity. The Massey 2850M can lift more, is physically larger, and costs less than the Kubota L4760. But the features are different. It's like shopping for a mattress.

My favorites on the list are the first one and the last one.
 

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Yooper In Training
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I now feel like I have been living behind a rock. I had to google quick hitch to see what it was. Does this work on most 3 point tools? Would it work on a brush hog, backblade and a snowblower?

This is painfull to ask, since I grew up farming...... lol
Yes to all. They're pretty awesome. The one piece style like mine has fixed spacing though so if you have a bunch of different implements of varying ages, they may not all fit. Or you could modify them to fit like I did with my ballast box that wasn't meant for quick hitches and I didn't know till it got delivered with the tractor. Most quick hitches are set up with bottom hooks sized for cat 3 pins though, so for cat 1 implements you need adapter bushings at $30 a set that stay on the implement with roll pins. You can get cat 1 quick hitches from a few companies too, but then you're limited on implement options.....though you would be anyway with the factory lift arms. So it really depends on use. My quick hitch works great for me and my limited implements. A lot of people like Pat's better because it's more adaptable. The Pat's style is just quick connect for the main/bottom attachments, so you still need to get off and hook up the top link, but that's the easy part. Benefit is that they're much more adaptable to various implements and pin spacing both horizontally and vertically. Slower to hook up and unhook than the 1 piece units, but still much faster than standard pins.

For PTO-driven implements you'll need either a shaft extender or a lot of people add a clutch to it to kill 2 birds with 1 stone.
 

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Desert Rat
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7,182 Posts
Discussion Starter · #38 ·
XXXJ -
I'm probably only about 30 minutes north of you and have a 2014 L3800 4wd Kubota. If you would like, you are welcome to stop up some evening or weekend and take it for a spin. I have acreage with woods, meadows and trails to get a feel that you may not be able to get at a dealer. Once you have one, you look for things to do with it...you may never be the same again.
I would definitely take you up on that generous offer.

When I moved in I never though I would need a tractor much bigger than my Simplicity. Maybe newer and better, but not bigger. The major reason for balking at the sub-compacts is half my property is on a slope. Gentle as it is, it’s enough to scare me up to a compact size. And, you know, “if bigger is better, MORE bigger is MORE better”, or something like that.


Her: ”are we gonna need a pole barn for that tractor?”
me: Where in the hell are we going to put a pole barn?
Her: “on that spot you are going to clear with your new tractor”
 

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Yooper In Training
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7,428 Posts
Her: ”are we gonna need a pole barn for that tractor?”
me: Where in the hell are we going to put a pole barn?
Her: “on that spot you are going to clear with your new tractor”
Apparently German girl is more American than you. She already gets it. Buy a tooth bar, you'll thank me later.

Once you have the tractor you'll find new jobs to do with it. They're super helpful for jobs you already know you need it for. They're even more helpful for jobs that you don't even know exist yet.
 

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I'll Direc your TV
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8,876 Posts
I now feel like I have been living behind a rock. I had to google quick hitch to see what it was. Does this work on most 3 point tools? Would it work on a brush hog, backblade and a snowblower?

This is painfull to ask, since I grew up farming...... lol
Yes and no, a quick hitch will allow you to attach your 3pt equipment really fast and mich easier. Its kinds hard to explain how it works on here, best bet is to just youtube some videos of them.

However, the biggest, and probabaly most important thing I learned real quick was that not all 3pt attachments are made to the same specs for the 3pt and the specs for quick hitches are not all standardized. There is a lot of variation between brands for measurements on them.

Yes to all. They're pretty awesome. The one piece style like mine has fixed spacing though so if you have a bunch of different implements of varying ages, they may not all fit. Or you could modify them to fit like I did with my ballast box that wasn't meant for quick hitches and I didn't know till it got delivered with the tractor. Most quick hitches are set up with bottom hooks sized for cat 3 pins though, so for cat 1 implements you need adapter bushings at $30 a set that stay on the implement with roll pins. You can get cat 1 quick hitches from a few companies too, but then you're limited on implement options.....though you would be anyway with the factory lift arms. So it really depends on use. My quick hitch works great for me and my limited implements. A lot of people like Pat's better because it's more adaptable. The Pat's style is just quick connect for the main/bottom attachments, so you still need to get off and hook up the top link, but that's the easy part. Benefit is that they're much more adaptable to various implements and pin spacing both horizontally and vertically. Slower to hook up and unhook than the 1 piece units, but still much faster than standard pins.

For PTO-driven implements you'll need either a shaft extender or a lot of people add a clutch to it to kill 2 birds with 1 stone.
Ill also add a bit here,

There's catagories of quick hitches just like catagories of 3pt: cat 0, cat 1, and cat 2 being the most common you'll see. The difference is size and HP those are rated for. Cat 0 is what you'll find on garden tractors and such, like a john deere 425 type machine, machines up to 20hp. Cat 1 is up to 50hp, and thats what you'll have on every compact tractor. Cat 2 is 50 to like 90hp. The difference, like said, is sizing and distance between 3pt mounts.

You don't have to get PTO adapters if you get a quick hitch for your equipment. I have a quick hitch on my kubota and dont have an adapeter extension on the PTO for the brush hog. A quick hitch will add about 4 inches to thr length of your 3pt arms, and most peoole already have a driveshaft. So when they add a quick hitch they'll find the drive shaft just a tad too short, and instead of spending $300+ on a new driveshaft, they'll buy a $30 extension. Its actually not recommended to use a PTO extender, its recommened to use a longer driveshaft.

That being said, on my old Kubota L4150, I used a PTO extension and never had an issue. I bent that driveshaft cause I forgot to unclip it from the PTO so when I bought a new one, I just bought a longer driveshaft for the brush hog.

The pats easy change is popular if you have/use a lot of older, and/or mismatched 3pt equipment just for the reason stated above. The difference in specs across the different manufacturers of 3pt equipment. The pats is a good midway between a full quick hitch setup and standard 3pt mounting. It still adds like 4 or so inches to the 3pt. I thought about getting a set of pats easy change but decided it would be worth it to take the time and modify my 3pt equipment to make all the 3pt stuff the same specs and spacing to be able to use my quick hitch as its meant to. Right now it works but with the different sizes its still a PIA to change over.

Also, i have a cat 1 quick hitch from Harbir Freight. Not a single thing wrong with it after 5 years of pretty rough use. Hell, it barley has any rust on it and it sits outside year round.
 
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