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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Smart? Dumb? Do I really need one? Is there any reason not to use one? Who's done it?

I'm really not under any time constraints, and I'm the one finding anything I'll want to look at. I basically just need someone to fill out paperwork if I put an offer on anything and check all the boxes through the process. Is that enough reason to use one?

Buying rusty old cars is so much easier, maybe I'll live in one of those.
 

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As a buyer there isn't a reason not to get one unless you are going to look at for sale by owners. Then you could contact one to see how much they would charge just for the paperwork of the sale. If you are looking at properties that are listed with a realtor the seller has to pay comission anyway so get one that will be on your side and may know the properties on the area.

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Good point. Why jump through more hoops when you don't get anything out of it.

I did read that in some cases the seller's and buyer's agents are listed as separate commissions on the sellers contract, so not using one in that case might earn you some more negotiating room since you're basically saving the seller money.
 

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I'm not old, honest...
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You don't need an agent but I think it's a good thing to have an attorney look it over. Mind you, I sold my last house and bought this house without an agent or attorney, we just relied on the title work. However, when we bought our place up north, a friend who is an attorney who specializes in properties looked at it and found an old obscure easement. The title company downplayed it and said it would never be enforced. However, with further research, it was still active and could have allowed the easement holder to cut 150' wide clearing across our property. Our attorney got the easement removed. just my .02
 

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Hack
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The title company downplayed it and said it would never be enforced.
Sort of like all the CEO's that go on CNBC and say 'The dividend in SAFE...'. Or the 'Business is SOUND...'.

NEVER trust anyone that is yelling outside the burning building that the place isn't on fire.

And that's why you need a professional to go over the 'paperwork'.
 

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Sort of like all the CEO's that go on CNBC and say 'The dividend in SAFE...'. Or the 'Business is SOUND...'.

NEVER trust anyone that is yelling outside the burning building that the place isn't on fire.

And that's why you need a professional to go over the 'paperwork'.
I wouldn't trust any typical RE agent to be diligent with obscure issues that may come up.

They will have the ability to put listings in front of you the instant they are listed, and that is what you should count on them for. Figure out your area and what parameters you need, look at a lot of houses, then watch new listings for the great houses that will be gone in days or hours of being listed.
 

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Thin Line Offroad
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You don't need an agent but I think it's a good thing to have an attorney look it over. Mind you, I sold my last house and bought this house without an agent or attorney, we just relied on the title work. However, when we bought our place up north, a friend who is an attorney who specializes in properties looked at it and found an old obscure easement. The title company downplayed it and said it would never be enforced. However, with further research, it was still active and could have allowed the easement holder to cut 150' wide clearing across our property. Our attorney got the easement removed. just my .02
Very good advice. I've always used either an agent or an attorney for just this reason. My folks got tied up in an easement situation as well years ago. They too got it cleared up but it was a pain.

Also, in my area of Michigan it is common for mortgage companies to try and "buy" your mineral rights via small print for a menial fee. They do this because Natural Gas is all over here. When I bought my first home my agent noticed it said I was selling my rights for $100 off closing fees. I said to remove that and kept the rights.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've read some pretty varied opinions on the matter. I've read where some got the selling agent to work for the buyer, being that if the agent is looking at getting double commission on the deal they'll be more motivated to make sure your offer is the one that works out. Which can also be a bad thing, you lose having a dedicated buyers agent who is legally obliged to work in your best interest.
 
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