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gas, grass, and ass
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm still a beginner at axles so please no hateful comments. I bought a set of axles to replace the ones that are in my truck. Eventually my truck will be a offroad only toy for r&v and silver lake. I can't find any axle trusses for the rear that say they fit my axle. Are all axle trusses for a 9.25 and dana 44 the same? Or are the tube diameters different?
 

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Yooper In Training
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Why not measure the tubes to see what size they are? You can make different trusses work on different axles, just need to know some of the key areas and similarities or differences to look for. From what I've seen, Artec has the best selection of different trusses
 

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Direct Drive FTW
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Ruff stuff sells a "medium weight truss" for like $100 and "truss extensions" for another $100 or so. Ruffstuff is known for strong quality parts.
Think there is a promo code in the vendor section.

You can grind the medium truss down to fit snug against your diff and slap the extensions against the main making adjustments as needed to give a perfect fit against your axle.

Grinder, flap disc, saw saw, files, and a welder are all the tools you will need.
 

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Premium Member
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With those tools you could make your own. Cardboard templates, go to local steel place. Have it all cut out. Then weld it together on your axle. Roughly same price, will fit how you want, look how you want and you'll have a custom truss you can say you made
 

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I made this one last weekend for a four link jeep build I'm doing. But I'm pretty fucking handy.



 

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skillicous
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don't overthink it. It's just adding more steel to stiffen it up.

What tools do you currently have?
 

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gas, grass, and ass
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
don't overthink it. It's just adding more steel to stiffen it up.

What tools do you currently have?
I have all the tools that cerial said, I would just feel more comfortable buying my first truss versus making one since I don't have the know-how yet.
 

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Im going FAST!!!
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I don't know of any production truss that gets real tight to the center section. Most likely you are not going to find exactly what you are looking for in a production built truss so you can either buy one and cut it down to fit tight to the center section, have someone build one for you OR build one yourself.

Cardboard makes a great template for getting tight to the center section and it is much easier and cheaper to work with for mock up than metal. THen you can trace out the cardboard on metal, cut it out and weld it up. Here is one I built for my 60 front.



 

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Also keep in mind that welding to a cast center section (especially that much weld) is best left to someone who knows what they're doing using the right process and materials. I think that's why so many truss kits out there don't sit tight against the center section.
 

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Also keep in mind that welding to a cast center section (especially that much weld) is best left to someone who knows what they're doing using the right process and materials. I think that's why so many truss kits out there don't sit tight against the center section.
good point
 

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Im going FAST!!!
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good point for sure tab, however, depending on the structure of the truss the center section welds are not needed, which is why the production ones can bridge the center section with out a problem. If you have adequate uprights throughout the truss that can handle bridging the center section then the center section weld is just extra insurance/cosmetic. (not sure you can call a weld cosmetic...lol but you know what I mean)

But again it all depends on the actual structure of the truss. Mine has multiple uprights inside the truss and its also tied into the front hydro truss, which spans the whole front of the axle too. The rear is tied into the pinnion on the 14 bolt.
 

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good point for sure tab, however, depending on the structure of the truss the center section welds are not needed, which is why the production ones can bridge the center section with out a problem. If you have adequate uprights throughout the truss that can handle bridging the center section then the center section weld is just extra insurance/cosmetic. (not sure you can call a weld cosmetic...lol but you know what I mean)

But again it all depends on the actual structure of the truss. Mine has multiple uprights inside the truss and its also tied into the front hydro truss. So it basically has two really beefy trusses. And the rear is tied into the pinnion on the 14 bolt.
Completely agree. :thumb: Just pointing out to the OP that the "tight fit" really isn't necessary since (in addition to your reason) any joe blow with a welder probably shouldn't be welding it there anyway.
 

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gas, grass, and ass
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks guys. This is all very helpful. I think what I'm going to do is buy a production truss and if it's not long enough or I'd like it longer I'll add on to it. It makes sense how hugging the differential wouldn't add much rigidity to the axle just mostly for looks.
 

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I'm not old, honest...
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One mistake for clearing the center section is that the truss doesn't help with spinning the tube in the dif. Ask me how I know, it's the repair I'm doing right now. :( And yes, I agree 100% with the proper weld aspect. I had previously welded mine with MIG and it didn't hold up. This time we did it with the proper preheat and high nickel rod.

One thing I see alot of guys do is truss it heavily on top so they can handle jumps but they don't truss it horizontally to handle impacts. I have never bent my axle vertically because I'm a puss and don't jump it. However, I've bent it twice banging it hard against big rocks. With my current setup, doing a nice clean truss like Tab and DJ posted isn't feasible since I already have link, shock, hydro steering and panhard bar mounts. It would have basically meant I need to strip the axle and start over. I'll be posting pics of what I am doing in my build thread in the next few days. It will be different and everyone will criticize it. :sonicjay:
 

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gas, grass, and ass
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I don't plan on jumping it....but then again nobody does. I'd only be able to truss the rear axle. On the front axle, thr coil mount is too close to the diff, there's only about 3 or 4 inches of room. Unless you know a way to be able to do it.
 

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Yooper In Training
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I don't plan on jumping it....but then again nobody does. I'd only be able to truss the rear axle. On the front axle, thr coil mount is too close to the diff, there's only about 3 or 4 inches of room. Unless you know a way to be able to do it.
If you're not gonna be rock crawling, truss the underside. I've done a few of those to clear coil buckets and they work well.
AAM 9.25


D44, could work if you notch it for coil buckets:



D60(not to clear coil buckets, but the bottom part may give you ideas)


Not going all the way across does NOT work. Don't do this:

#nicecamberbro


Decent way to brace inner C's:
 
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