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Old July 8th, 2019, 02:55 PM   #1
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Default Finishing a room in the basement

With my in-laws moving to South Carolina near Christmas, my wife and I talked about adding a room in the basement for them when they come to stay. Our basement is currently finished (done by the previous owners) so I was going to take a section of the unfinished storage area and turn it into a bedroom.

Anyone done this type of work before? I am pretty mechanically inclined but have not really done any construction type work. Any tips / advice would be much appreciated.
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Old July 8th, 2019, 04:14 PM   #2
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are you worried about having a legal egress? or does the basement have one?
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Old July 9th, 2019, 05:37 AM   #3
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are you worried about having a legal egress? or does the basement have one?
No, I have one window that is an egress, that is the area I will put the bedroom. my main concerns are really how to do this properly. The basement is cool / cold all the time, so insulation for comfort and privacy is a must. What type do I use? Carpet would be best on the floor because of the cool temperature. Do I just lay down padding and carpet, or is there some type of barrier that needs to be laid down first? Like I said in my original post, I am handy, but have no real experience in construction. Any info would be much appreciated.
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Old July 9th, 2019, 07:54 AM   #4
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First and foremost does it stay dry !!!! year round

If so I would anchor 2x4s to the walls and frame in the room. Then throw in some electrical boxes and Romax I try to space them no grater than every 6' around the room. than call up the boys at Foam All and have them squirt the walls and then hang up drywall and or paneling. Trim the room out after the carpet and padding is down and hang the door you should have it done in two weeks


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Old July 9th, 2019, 07:58 AM   #5
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Shit I forgot cut in to your ductwork and add a drop in your new room
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Old July 9th, 2019, 08:00 AM   #6
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Basements are tricky. Typically, there is moisture wicking through the walls and floor; what you can do depends on how much moisture. I'd suggest doing some research. Many people will suggest taping a 1'x1' square of plastic down on the floor, and leave it for a while, and observe how much moisture collects. If none collects, you have more freedom to do what you want. If moisture does exist, then you have to take extra steps to allow the floors and walls to breath.

Our current house is actually very dry, plus it has drain tiles around the perimeter, going into a sump with a sump pump. Even with that, I'd was planning on putting down Delta FL (can be found at Lowes), and then OSB. The Delta FL is corrugated, so air can still move across the surface of the concrete floor, while creating a moisture and thermal break between the concrete and OSB. This gives you a warmer and softer floor.

Concerning walls, you want a gap between the concrete and wood framing. No untreated wood should ever touch concrete, but this also leaves an open cavity for air flow, even if you put open face fiberglass batting in the wood framed wall.

Of course, for a guest room, I don't know if that is worth the added effort. Most people seem to put down pad and carpet. That is how the rest of our basement current is. I don't like it, but I didn't build it.

Walls are easy. Studs 16" on center. Tip: If you measure from the left, mark every 16" as indicated on virtually every tape measure, then attach your studs to the right of those ticks. Reverse that if you measure from the right. Don't try to mark the actual center; it's so much more work, and you'll never do it nearly as accurately. You should be lining up the edges of studs with tick marks. Look up how to properly build corners. As long as you do all this correctly, sheetrock goes up easy. Look up how to run electric wiring. Even if you hire that out, having the holes and boxes ready should save you some cash. You may even be able to run the wire, and hire out the hookups. Should be a very small job and likely very worth hiring out, or at least get help from someone with experience. You can fudge the rest, but eletricals are something to mess around with. Also, look up electrical and pigtails. Do pigtails. Well, for a job this small, I suppose it doesn't really matter, but pigtail connections are better and safer. Every outlet has a full wired path back to the panel vs. daisy chained and hopping through each outlet up the path to the breaker.
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Old July 9th, 2019, 08:26 AM   #7
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I did mine a few years ago. I have not added the legal egress yet. I did the tape plastic to several spots on the floor to look for moisture trick, it always felt dry in mine, just cool, and that just confirmed it.

I glued that blue dense foamboard to the walls as a vapor barrier, some use a thin thing of plastic. I then left a 1.5" air gap to the foam board and built my 2x4 walls and insulated those. You lose square footage this way, and they make basement wall systems that get around this, but they are pricey.

I bought the moisture resistant carpet pad and just laid the carpet on the concrete. My basement stays pretty cozy now. If it gets a little chilly a small space heater takes the edge off quickly.

I have not finished the ceiling yet, if I did that it would be even better.
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Old July 9th, 2019, 08:35 AM   #8
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To answer a couple of things;

The basement does stay dry year round. The house was built in 2002 and has a pretty big sloping grade and a sump pump that rarely runs. There is the typical feel of a little moisture in the air just from being in a basement, but nothing I'd worry about. I run a standalone dehumidifier in the summer and a humidifier on the furnace in the winter to aid in moisture control.

Basement or not, I would like this room to look and feel just like any other room in the house. (with the exception of a drop ceiling like the rest of the basement)
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Old July 9th, 2019, 01:25 PM   #9
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Most everything you need to know has been posted.

Watch some you tube videos for carpentry advise. Also go back and sift through RBB's build thread. He shows a lot of how to information in there….
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Old July 10th, 2019, 06:59 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by roll-bar Bob View Post
Shit I forgot cut in to your ductwork and add a drop in your new room
This - return air too, to keep everything circulating.
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Old July 10th, 2019, 07:48 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by mtnbikinbryno View Post
This - return air too, to keep everything circulating.
You (both) bring up a good point. I need to look into how I am going to run duct work to that area. And, do I want a cold air return in that room? I don't think there are any in the basement currently.
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Old July 11th, 2019, 08:09 AM   #12
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You (both) bring up a good point. I need to look into how I am going to run duct work to that area. And, do I want a cold air return in that room? I don't think there are any in the basement currently.
By cold air return, do you mean return air? You don't NEED need it, but it will help with circulation and dehumidification.

It doesn't necessarily need to be in the room to be finished.... for example, you could run a new return air duct line from somewhere in the basement into your return air supply close to the furnace. It's just not supposed to draw from close to your washer/dryer, FYI.
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Old July 11th, 2019, 08:43 AM   #13
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Quote:
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By cold air return, do you mean return air? You don't NEED need it, but it will help with circulation and dehumidification.

It doesn't necessarily need to be in the room to be finished.... for example, you could run a new return air duct line from somewhere in the basement into your return air supply close to the furnace. It's just not supposed to draw from close to your washer/dryer, FYI.
Washer and dryer are on the main floor, so that's not an issue.

I looked last night and there is a return vent down there already, so I'm good. I just need to run ducting into the area that will be a bedroom.
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Old July 11th, 2019, 07:45 PM   #14
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There is a product for basements that I would use under any flooring. That allows for moisture and water to drain. Also it does make the floor feel warmer. You can find it at Home Depot and Lowes.
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Old July 12th, 2019, 05:43 AM   #15
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There is a product for basements that I would use under any flooring. That allows for moisture and water to drain. Also it does make the floor feel warmer. You can find it at Home Depot and Lowes.
Any idea what this product is?
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Old July 12th, 2019, 07:44 AM   #16
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Any idea what this product is?
Google

Dricore Subfloor is the first and most important step towards creating a new living space as warm and comfortable as any other space in your home. Dricore. is the one-step engineered sub floor solution that is specifically designed for basements. The raised moisture barrier covers cold, damp concrete to protect, insulate and cushion your finished floors. Concrete continually releases moisture. Dricore. Subfloor panels have been designed with patented air gap technology to keep basement floors dry, comfortable and cozy throughout the entire year. Dricore. Subfloor panels promote good indoor air quality by allowing concrete to breathe, which in turn reduces the potential for mold and mildew. Dricore. Subfloor panels are fast and easy to install; a typical 500 square foot basement installs in an afternoon.



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Old July 12th, 2019, 09:14 AM   #17
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Quote:
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Google

Dricore Subfloor is the first and most important step towards creating a new living space as warm and comfortable as any other space in your home. Dricore. is the one-step engineered sub floor solution that is specifically designed for basements. The raised moisture barrier covers cold, damp concrete to protect, insulate and cushion your finished floors. Concrete continually releases moisture. Dricore. Subfloor panels have been designed with patented air gap technology to keep basement floors dry, comfortable and cozy throughout the entire year. Dricore. Subfloor panels promote good indoor air quality by allowing concrete to breathe, which in turn reduces the potential for mold and mildew. Dricore. Subfloor panels are fast and easy to install; a typical 500 square foot basement installs in an afternoon.



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sub floor pricing seems reasonable, but the walls are a little spendy.
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