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Old April 17th, 2006, 03:00 PM   #1
motrctyman
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Default EPA map of hazardous waste sites

Plug in your zip code and see what hazardous, toxic or superfund site is near you. CC's biz is in the middle of it!

EnviroMapper for Envirofacts

(Sorry BIOBILL!):tonka:
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Old April 17th, 2006, 03:01 PM   #2
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That was your 400th post

And CC and I both work within 20 feet of a landfill....sucky!!!
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Old April 17th, 2006, 03:56 PM   #3
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Auburn hills is a very odd location.. You have very very nice top of the line manufactoring plants circling this giant landfill.

They say the water is safe here, but we don't drink it.
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Old April 17th, 2006, 06:16 PM   #4
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my parents house is in a bubble of cleanliness but out by where i live in allendale there are a few hazardous waste places
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Old April 17th, 2006, 07:05 PM   #5
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Back in the 90's when I was getting my Hazmat Mngt degree we studied stuff like this. It used to be that most of the Superfund sites in Michigan were located along the 96 corridor from Livonia to Detroit. You could also track them along the Lodge as well.

It looks like the map shows all facilities that create hazardous materials as well which includes places like Oil Changes shops, auto shops which use solvents, dry cleaners, etc. It doesn't necessarily mean you are living in a chemical dump. However if you live next to one of the Superfund sites....MOVE!
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Old April 17th, 2006, 07:32 PM   #6
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what exactly is a superfund?
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Old April 17th, 2006, 07:35 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KimbaJo
It looks like the map shows all facilities that create hazardous materials as well which includes places like Oil Changes shops, auto shops which use solvents, dry cleaners, etc. It doesn't necessarily mean you are living in a chemical dump.
Yeah, I just realized this.. Even fast food restraunts make the list.
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Old April 17th, 2006, 08:10 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by junk90xj
what exactly is a superfund?
In a nutshell...a really bad hazardous waste site...i.e. Love Canal.

Exactly:

Superfund
The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), or Superfund, was passed by Congress in 1980 to address the problem of cleaning up abandoned toxic waste dump sites. The legislation sought to define liability for individual toxic waste sites and then clean up those sites from a fund, the Superfund, built from taxes and fines assigned to the entities that polluted individual sites.

The legislation was passed in response to the 1978 Love Canal incident. From the late 1940s to the early 1950s, the Hooker Chemical Company in Niagara Falls, NY stored barrels of manufacturing wastes in an old canal, called the Love Canal. The wastes included organic solvents, pesticides, and acids. The canal had also been previously used as a landfill to store wastes by both the city of Niagara Falls and the US Army. By 1953 the landfill was full, and Hooker Chemical Company covered the canal with layers of dirt. The Niagara Falls school board, looking for room to build a new school, approached the company about purchasing the land over the canal. The company, fearing liability, refused. After the city threatened to take the land by eminent domain, the company handed over the land for $1 on the condition that it be released from liability.

Despite the company's warning, the city built a school near the perimeter of the canal. By 1978, there were about 800 homes in the neighborhood. After underground sewers were laid in the area, residents began to notice wastes seeping out of the ground. Concerned about the effect on their children's health, residents of the neighborhood asked the New York State Department of Health to investigate. The State Department of Health declared a "health emergency" and evacuated residents of over 200 homes near the canal. In addition to state funding, President Jimmy Carter declared a federal health emergency and pledged federal funding for the residents. Occidental Petroleum, which owned the Hooker Chemical Company, ultimately paid $98 million to New York and $129 million to the federal government to pay for cleaning up the site, and $20 million to settle a class action lawsuit brought by the residents of the neighborhood.

To address problems with similar abandoned waste sites, Congress rushed the Superfund legislation into law by 1980. The law has been controversial since the beginning, in large part because of its broad definition of liability. The law was intended to ensure that responsible parties and not the taxpaying public would bear the costs cleaning up toxic waste sites. Congress cast the financial liability for cleaning up Superfund sites in very broad terms such as "strict," "retroactive," and "joint and several."

Under this definition of liability, a party that unknowingly took over a site long after some other party contaminated it could be forced to pay for its entire cleanup. Or, a company could be held liable and assessed costs steep enough to bankrupt it for using waste management practices that were entirely legal at the time. As a result, much of the government and corporate resources expended on Superfund enforcement have taken the form of lawsuits. In some cases these lawsuits have been undertaken by companies believing that they have been targeted for cleanup costs unfairly under the broad scope of Superfund liability. In other cases, however, companies that are themselves responsible for the waste at a given site have sought to take advantage of the law's broad understanding of liability by suing other businesses. For example, a chemical company identified as the primary polluter for a given site might sue a company that transported waste to and from the area. As a result, only a small number of sites on the Superfund priority list have been successfully remediated.

In the years since the Superfund Law was passed, several revisions have been made to both the law itself and to some of the EPA's methods of enforcing the law. These revisions have sought to speed up remediation of Superfund sites, and have taken steps designed to refine enforcement so that it involves more cooperation between regulators and polluters, which in turn lessens the amount of time and resources devoted to lawsuits. Authorization of Superfund tax, which was intended to provide funding for cleanup, expired in 1995. Controversy over this legislation has impeded Congressional attempts to pass new legislation or re-authorize the Superfund tax.
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