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Old February 10th, 2006, 04:23 PM   #1
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Post York/Sanden On Board Air FAQ and Setup

YORK/SANDEN On Board Air FAQ

The main component of an on board air setup in an old (or new) A/C compressor. All these units are is an engine driven pump. Since they are designed to produce a fairly decent amount of pressure, one makes some minor modifications to run air. I will go over the types of compressors, what vehicles these compressors are found on, mounting, connectors, hoses, valves, switches, and tanks. I will admit that I have not yet attempted my own setup. I do have a compressor ready to be put in and and soon going to invest my own personal time and money into one, thus I want to make absolutely certain this writeup is correct.

The next order of business is identifying the different possible compressors and deciding which one is best for your application, and where to find it.



The more popular choice of compressor would be a “York” style. These are more popular because they have their own internal oil supply, thus not needing any extra lubrication normally received from the A/C fluid. They've been around for a really long time and can still be found at a lot of junkyards. Because they carry their own oil they do not get as hot as quickly and bearings last longer.
Pros:
  • Continuous operation (own oil)
  • Common
  • Proven reliability (most OBA setups use this compressor)
Cons:
  • HUGE! 6”wide – 8” deep (W/ clutch) – 10.5” tall (W/ SHORT connectors)
  • Pulley modification needed for a serpentine pattern
  • OR custom Idler pulley for serpentine-V belt converter
  • OR 6/8 groove serpentine clutches, $130 new
Before purchasing your York compressor be advised there are 3 different sizes (internally) the pumps came in. 10.3 ci (169 cc) – model 210, 8.69 ci (142 cc) – model 209, and 6.10 ci (100 cc) – model 206. The larger 2 are fairly close in size and should be more than acceptable. However the smaller of the pumps need not be cast away. If you are going the custom Idler pulley route you could put a larger V-belt pulley on the end of the smaller serpentine pulley, thus increasing the overall speed* of the pump and compensating for it's lack of displacement.

One may be able to look at the tag on the front of the compressor and determine it's displacement. I have not had good luck with this method, and recommend not relying on this method. My York tag did not match up with any on-line source (even the York service manual I.D. Info). However, because some may match up, here is a picture of the tag and what the information means. The most reliable way of determining the displacement of a York is the end of the crankshaft.

The following is how one can remove the clutch the clutch:
  1. Engage the clutch mechanism by connecting it to a battery source.
  2. Secure the outer clutch wheel either by a strap wrench or vice (anything that can hold it still).
  3. Remove the center bolt and washer (1/2" socket).
  4. Run a 2" long, 5/8" coarse thread bolt in until it bottoms against the crankshaft and forces the clutch off.
Look at the end of the crankshaft. The end is flat on all models.
  • If the edge of the flat end is beveled, you've got the small displacement. 6.10 ci (100 cc) – model 206
  • If it's a sharp corner, but with a thin groove for a retaining clip (there shouldn't be a clip), you've got the medium displacement. 8.69 ci (142 cc) – model 209
  • If it's a sharp corner without any groove, you've got the large displacement. 10.3 ci (169 cc) – model 210
Here is a picture from the Climate Control website Service Manual that also describes the crankshaft ends.

Kilby offers pumps, serpentine clutches and a full install kits. Good looking kit though, but for a price.

*Max RPM for York compressor is 6,000RPM (compressor speed), 4,000RPM Continuous (compressor speed)

Mounting the York
The York compressor is rather flexible in terms of mounting position. The York can be mounted forwards or backwards on the engine* (clutch pointing towards the back of the vehicle, housing in front of the belt system), upright or on either side completely horizontal, or on any angle in between (so long as oil can reach bearings**). So despite it's size it can still be squeezed into certain cramped areas.

*INTAKE/EXHAUST ports will be flipped! Be sure you know which port is intake/exhaust!

**York recommends that when lying 90° (horizontal) that the suction port be on top as to keep as much oil as possible from being pumped into the system.

Since this is intended to be a universal vehicle post I'm not going to cover brackets. Each engine and vehicle is different and I shall leave it up to you to figure out where to position the pump and how to secure it. The more time and patience spent here, the nicer the swap will look and the better it will function. I'll make a note that serpentine belts have a little less tolerance for something not being lined up right, be sure you have it correct and very little deflection.

The Pulley
First: Supposedly a serpentine pulley was installed on early-mid 80's Mustangs. So far, to my knowlege, none have ever been found. If you stumble across one in a junkyard, you are a deity among puny mortals.

There are a couple ways to deal with the V-grooves. One is to weld on a serpentine pulley over the V-grooves, you could turn the v-grooves down a bit too for a smaller pulley. Another option is to take the pulley to a machine shop and have them turn it down into a serpentine pattern. Neither of the local Ferris machine shops agreed to take part in this (they claim it will be too thin, but it's been done before) However, the schools welding lab agreed to weld on a pulley for free, so I'm going to go that route with mine.

Last edited by Captain Ledd; February 14th, 2006 at 07:35 PM.
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Old February 10th, 2006, 04:26 PM   #2
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Locating a York Compressor
New York compressors can be found HERE This company acquired the rights to the York and continue to produce it. Otherwise, your searching the Junkyards. I have found a list of the vehicles that allegedly came with Yorks (sizes unknown), in general they were on a lot of cars and trucks from the mid 70's to the mid 80's so this list probably isn't complete, nor if a vehicle is on this list guarantee that it's A/C system has a York. The gray color does not indicate a unique pump, it's purpose is for easier reading.

Base vehicle information from “http://www.hancockindustries.com “, original list by “4RnrRick” on Pirate 4x4.
O-Ring connector / Flange connector
RHS=Right Hand Suction / LHS=Left Hand Suction
  • AUDI, 100LS, 76-77, Tube O-Ring RHS
  • FORD, Bronco (Factory Air), 78-81, Tube O-Ring LHS
  • FORD, Bronco (Dealer Air), 78-83, Flange RHS
  • FORD, Country Squire (Dealer Air), 75-84, Flange RHS
  • FORD, Crown Victoria, LTD Full Size (Dealer Air), 75-84, Flange RHS
  • FORD, E Series Van (Factory Air), 76-82, Tube O-Ring LHS
  • FORD, E Series Van (Dealer Air), 76-85, Flange RHS
  • FORD, F Series Pickup F150-F350 (Factory Air), 76-81, Tube O-Ring LHS
  • FORD, F Series Pickup F150-F350 (Dealer Air), 80-85, Flange RHS
  • FORD, Fairmont (Factory Air), 79-82, Tube O-Ring LHS
  • FORD, Fairmont (Dealer Air), 79-83, Flange RHS
  • FORD, Granada (Factory Air), 80-82, Tube O-Ring LHS
  • FORD, Granada (Dealer Air), 76-82, Flange RHS
  • FORD, LTD II (Dealer Air), 83-84, Flange RHS
  • FORD, Maverick (Factory Air), 76-77, Tube O-Ring LHS
  • FORD, Maverick (Dealer Air), 76-77, Flange RHS
  • FORD, Mustang (Factory Air), 76-81, Tube O-Ring LHS
  • FORD, Mustang (Dealer Air), 79-84, Flange RHS
  • FORD, Pinto (Factory Air), 76-80, Tube O-Ring LHS
  • FORD, Pinto (Dealer Air), 76-80, Flange RHS
  • FORD, Ranger (Dealer Air), 83-84, Flange RHS
  • FORD, Thunderbird (Factory Air), 77-82, Tube O-Ring LHS
  • FORD, Thunderbird (Dealer Air), 80-88, Flange RHS
  • FORD, Torino (Factory Air), 76, Tube O-Ring LHS
  • FORD, Torino (Dealer Air), 76, Flange RHS
  • JEEP, Cherokee, 76-83, Tube O-Ring RHS
  • JEEP, Cherokee, 76-83, Flange RHS
  • JEEP, Comanche, 86-88, Tube O-Ring RHS
  • JEEP, Grand Wagoneer, 84-91, Tube O-Ring RHS
  • JEEP, Wagoneer, 76-83, Tube O-Ring RHS
  • MERCURY, Bobcat (Factory Air), 76-80, Tube O-Ring LHS
  • MERCURY, Bobcat (Delear Air), 76-80, Flange RHS
  • MERCURY, Capri (Factory Air), 79-82, Tube O-Ring LHS
  • MERCURY, Capri (Dealer Air), 79-84, Flange RHS
  • MERCURY, Colony Park (Dealer Air), 80-84, Flange RHS
  • MERCURY, Comet (Factory Air), 76-77, Tube O-Ring LHS
  • MERCURY, Comet (Dealer Air), 76-77, Flange RHS
  • MERCURY, Cougar (Factory Air), 76-82, Tube O-Ring LHS
  • MERCURY, Cougar (Dealer Air), 76-82, Flange RHS
  • MERCURY, Grand Marquis (Dealer Air), 83-84, Flange RHS
  • MERCURY, Marquis - Full Size (Dealer Air), 80-82, Flange RHS
  • MERCURY, Marquis - Mid Size (Dealer Air), 83-84, Flange RHS
  • MERCURY, Monarch (Factory Air), 80, Tube O-Ring LHS
  • MERCURY, Monarch (Dealer Air), 76-80, Flange RHS
  • MERCURY, Montego (Factory Air), 76, Tube O-Ring LHS
  • MERCURY, Montego (Dealer Air), 76, Flange RHS
  • MERCURY, Zephyr (Factory Air), 78-82, Tube O-Ring LHS
  • MERCURY, Zephyr (Dealer Air), 78-83, Flange RHS
  • PORSCHE, 911, 78-83, Flattop RHS ?
  • PORSCHE, 914, 73-76, Flattop RHS ?
  • PORSCHE, 930, 77-79, Flattop RHS ?
  • VOLVO, 240 Series, 75-84, Flange RHS

Keep in mind that those are probable vehicles and might not have A/C installed.




These are the more modern style compressors that are currently available on vehicles. This particular style is lubricated by a small reservoir of oil. These compressors have the advantage of being small. They can be packed into much smaller areas than the York. The internal displacement is similar to that of a York 6.1 ci (100 cc) to 9.5 ci (155 cc). I have not found anything that claims they can be run backwards so I would assume not (I also don't know the internal workings of them). They are readily available with V-belt or serpentine clutches from the factory. Since this style is newer and extremely common, chances are that your vehicle may already have one on it, if you don't care to have A/C anymore, you have a pump already!

Pros:
  • Very Common
  • Very compact
  • Factory serpentine/V-belt
Cons:
  • Small oil supply
  • I've heard numerous rumors they overheat in continuous operation since they have much less oil

A way to help combat the over heating is to rig a piece of NPT pipe into the oil fill hole, fill the tube with oil and cap it off. You can also put an adapter like 1/4”-1/2” pipe connector in it (I'm not sure if thats the correct size, just an example) and run an inch or 2 of the larger DIA pipe and cap it off with a comparable sized cap for even more oil volume. Other wise I've heard they need their very small oil reservoir regularly checked after every few uses and a squirt of oil added. I imagine some 5W-30 or probably a bit lighter oil will work since you don't have to worry about contaminating the A/C system.


Compressor RPM Ratings are available in Service Manual since many different models have many different ratings.

Last edited by Captain Ledd; February 13th, 2006 at 08:58 PM.
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Old February 10th, 2006, 04:28 PM   #3
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Mounting the SD Compressor
Near as I can tell they can be mounted at any angle up to 90° (horizontal). Certain pumps* cannot be mounted with the suction port on the bottom.

On this particular compressor I'd recommend using an oiler too. Lots of people running this type of compressor seem to use one. Mount it somewhere on the intake line. they're usually for air tools and they can meter how much oil gets put into the line.

Since this is intended to be a universal vehicle post I'm not going to cover brackets. Each engine and vehicle is different and I shall leave it up to you to figure out where to position the pump and how to secure it. The more time and patience spent here, the nicer the swap will look and the better it will function. I'll make a note that serpentine belts have a little less tolerance for something not being lined up right, be sure you have it correct and very little deflection.

* #9699-9630, #9150-9630, #9695-9630, #9298-9630, #9517-9630, #9516-9630, #7406-9630 – Service manual clarifies w/ pictures: page 8

Locating an SD Compressor
These are common on vehicles from the late 80's and newer, and are extremely common. Sanden discontinued the SD compressor in April 1st 2000. The SD-5 style is still produced by Sanden-Singapore (somehow different) and will have to be ordered through them.

The following list of vehicles allegedly came with a Sanden compressor. This list probably isn't complete, nor if a vehicle is on this list guarantee that it's A/C system has a Sanden compressor . Model information can be found in the service manual. The gray compressors indicate nothing unique or special, just making it easier to read. Compiled again by information from “http://www.hancockindustries.com“, original list by “4RnrRick” on Pirate 4x4.
  • ALFA ROMEO, Milano, 82, SD508
  • ALFA ROMEO, Spider, 82-88, SD508
  • DODGE, Dakota, 94-98, SD7H15
  • DODGE, Dakota, 91-93, SDB709
  • DODGE, Monaco, 90-92, SD709
  • DODGE, Pickups (Fullsize), 92-00, SD7H15
  • EAGLE, Medallion, 88-89, SD709
  • EAGLE, Premier, 89-92, SD709
  • FORD, Bronco (Dealer Air), 88-93, SD709
  • FORD, Bronco II (Dealer Air), 90, SD709
  • FORD, E Series Van (Dealer Air), 90-93, SD709
  • FORD, E Series Van (Dealer Air), 88-91, SD508
  • FORD, Escort, EXP (Dealer Air), 88-90, SD709
  • FORD, Escort, EXP (Dealer Air), 86-87, SD508
  • FORD, F Series Pickup F150-F350 (Dealer Air), 90-93, SD709
  • FORD, F Series Pickup F150-F350 (Dealer Air), 88-89, SD508
  • FORD, Mustang (Dealer Air), 88-93, SD709
  • FORD, Ranger (Dealer Air), 88-92, SD709
  • FORD, Ranger (Dealer Air), 88-89, SD508
  • FORD, Tempo (Dealer Air), 88-91, SD709
  • FORD, Tempo (Dealer Air), 86-87, SD508
  • GEO, Metro, 94-00, SD7B10
  • GEO, Tracker (Factory Air), 95-98, SD7B10
  • GEO, Tracker (Aftermarket Air), 89-96, SD505
  • HYUNDAI, Excel, 86-94, SD709
  • HYUNDAI, Scoupe, 91-92, SD709
  • JAGUAR, XJ6 (Vanden Plas), 93-96, SD7H15
  • JAGUAR, XJ6 (Vanden Plas), 88-92, SD709
  • JAGUAR, XJ6 (Vanden Plas), 88-92, SD510
  • JAGUAR, XJ12, 93-94, SD7H15
  • JAGUAR, XJ12, 88-92, SD709
  • JAGUAR, XJ12, 88-92, SD510
  • JAGUAR, XJS, 93-96, SD7H15
  • JAGUAR, XJS, 88-92, SD709
  • JAGUAR, XJS, 88-92, SD510
  • JAGUAR, XJR, 93-96, SD7H15
  • JEEP, Cherokee, 94-98, SD7H15
  • JEEP, Cherokee, 91-93, SD709
  • JEEP, Cherokee, 81-90, SD508
  • JEEP, Comanche, 91-92, SD709
  • JEEP, Comanche, 86-90, SD508
  • JEEP, Grand Wagoneer, 84-86, SD508
  • JEEP, Wagoneer, 96, SD709
  • JEEP, Wagoneer, 81-90, SD508
  • JEEP, Wrangler, 97, SD7H15
  • JEEP, Wrangler, 92, SD709
  • JEEP, Wrangler, 87-90, SD508
  • LANDROVER, Range Rover, 87-95, SD709
  • MAZDA, 626/MX-6, 97-00, SD709
  • MAZDA, 626/MX-6, 79-85, SD508
  • MAZDA, B1600-B4000 Pickup, 86-93, SD708
  • MAZDA, B1600-B4000 Pickup, 86-89, SD508
  • MAZDA, B1600-B4000 Pickup, 82-84, SD575
  • MAZDA, B1600-B4000 Pickup, 76-81, SD508
  • MAZDA, Cosmo, 76-78, SD508
  • MAZDA, GLC, 84-85, SD575
  • MAZDA, GLC, 77-83, SD508
  • MAZDA, RX3/RX7, 86-91, SD708
  • MAZDA, RX3/RX7, 82-85, SD575
  • MAZDA, RX3/RX7, 76-81, SD508
  • MERCURY, LN7/Lynx (Dealer Air), 86-87, SD508
  • MERCURY, Topaz (Dealer Air), 88-91, SD709
  • MERCURY, Topaz (fACTORY Air), 86-87, SD508
  • MERCURY, Tracer (Dealer Air), 87-89, SD508
  • MITSUBISHI, Precis, 90-93, SD709
  • PEUGEOT, 405, 89-91, SD709
  • PEUGEOT, 504, 80-83, SD510
  • PEUGEOT, 504, 80-83, SD508
  • PEUGEOT, 505, 80-87, SD510
  • PEUGEOT, 505, 80-87, SD508
  • PEUGEOT, 604, 80-84, SD510
  • PEUGEOT, 604, 80-84, SD508
  • RENAULT, 18i, 81-83, SD508
  • RENAULT, Alliance, 83-87, SD508
  • RENAULT, Encore, 84-86, SD508
  • RENAULT, Fuego, 82-85, SD508
  • RENAULT, GTA, 87, SD508
  • RENAULT, LeCar, 81-83, SD508
  • RENAULT, Medallion, 88-90, SD709
  • RENAULT, Sportswagon, 84-86, SD508
  • SAAB, 900 Series, 86-87, SD508
  • SAAB, 900 Series, 79-85, SD510
  • SAAB, 9000 Series, 86-97, SD709
  • SUBARU, Brat/Coupe/Hardtop/Hatchback/Sedan, 81-82, SD508
  • SUZUKI, Swift, 94-96, SD7B10
  • VOLKSWAGEN, Beetle, 98-01, SD7V16
  • VOLKSWAGEN, Cabriolet, 85-92, SD508
  • VOLKSWAGEN, Corrado, 92, SD709
  • VOLKSWAGEN, Corrado, 92, SD7V10
  • VOLKSWAGEN, Corrado, 90-91, SD709
  • VOLKSWAGEN, Dasher, 76-81, SD508
  • VOLKSWAGEN, Eurovan, 92-95, SD7H15
  • VOLKSWAGEN, Golf/GTI, 83-92, SD508
  • VOLKSWAGEN, Jetta, 93-00, SD7V16
  • VOLKSWAGEN, Jetta, 81-92, SD508
  • VOLKSWAGEN, Passat, 92-97, SD7V16
  • VOLKSWAGEN, Passat, 90-92, SD709
  • VOLKSWAGEN, Pickup, 80-83, SD508
  • VOLKSWAGEN, Scirocco, 89-95, SD508
  • VOLKSWAGEN, Vanagan, 87-91, SD709
  • VOLKSWAGEN, Vanagan, 84-87, SD510
  • VOLKSWAGEN, Vanagan, 80-86, SD508
  • VOLVO, 960 Series, 93-95, SD7H15
  • VOLVO, 960 Series, 92, SD709

Keep in mind that those are probable vehicles and might not have A/C installed.

Last edited by Captain Ledd; February 19th, 2006 at 02:53 PM.
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Old February 10th, 2006, 04:29 PM   #4
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Connectors and Fittings

I cannot seem to be able to find a consistent size of that connectors, so I'll post guidelines. Basically check out on line stores for air fittings, or heck, even pluming or gas pipe fittings, like the black iron pipe found in the plumbing isle of Home Depot or Lowes. Just make sure you use pipe sealant! And wait until it dries. Try not to use pipe less than 3/8” DIA, Less than 3/8” DIA will choke the airflow and air tools won't make as much power, and tires won't fill as fast. I imagine the store wouldn't have a problem with you taking the compressor in to check the sizes of your compressors' threads, it's not like they sell automotive A/C compressors.

The examples of pipe I'm talking about are (Blurry, but you get the idea) 45° / 90°, "T" fitting, etc.. you get the idea. These can be used anywhere you wish, manifold, splitter for different parts of airline, they're pretty universal, go nuts.

You can also change the style connector coming out of the top, and change different size connectors (as mine are) to the same size (at least the O-ring style connector, make sure to use pipe sealant), I haven't seen the underside of a flange connector. Do your best to limit the amount of connectors on the pump, and switch over to hose as soon as possible. This is extra weight flopping around with the engine and stresses the pump casting due to a lever effect. If you wish to go the proper route, Kilby also offers fittings specifically for the top of a York compressor: Flange Fittings

You'll also need a Manifold of some sort. Basically just something to split up the air flow to different parts of the vehicle. Like a bunch of “T” fittings hooked together. You can have “T” fittings separate as well, like one towards the back of your rig so there's not a bunch of hoses running parallel to each other for air outlets on either side. On most setups the manifold is mounted on the firewall. It's a nice open area and you can keep it visually inspected. be sure to use liberal amounts of pipe sealant. When assembling the fitting if there is a "T" connector or a 90° or 45° elbow or some piece that needs to face a certain direction, screw the piece on tight and then get a wrench and crank it on further untill it faces the nessecary direction.

Also, all fittings should be NPT! (national pipe thread) Most should, some may not, just in case you find a few that aren't.. well, they need to be.

On air tool quick connectors, be sure to buy as many female ends as you do male (and vise-versa) so you can make “caps” for the ends of the lines so mud and crap isn't filling up the end of the quick connect.

Kilby also has a supply of air hose connectors with some good visual references of what you're looking for.

For other connectors poke around this site a little too, http://www.fittingsandadapters.com/ . Lots of neat connectors on there.

Air Hose

Some 3/8” flexible straight rubber air hose should do the trick (1/4" would choke the airflow). Originally I had concern about it rotting out, but most is made out of PVC, and realistically, if you hose your engine out every now and again, it shouldn't be a problem. I also originally suggested soft-flexible copper tubing as some hard line between permanent mounting locations, I found out this is a bad idea. Copper will work harden itself (from being under pressure) and become brittle after a while, and prone to cranking, houses don't really move or flex that much, but everything on a truck will. I retract my statement from earlier and DO NOT USE SOFT COPPER TUBING. Air hose is available pretty much anywhere that has tools for ~$18 for a 50' roll, which is not expensive. For custom lengths of line there are repair kits also available, these seem kinda cheap and I personally don't like them, but I haven't found a kit to make your own nice ends that look like the hoses were made with them. This is for the permanent routing of air on your vehicle and won't be moved around much, so be sure to splurge and get quality stuff here.

Similar to the site listed above, http://airhosereels.com/ . They have all sorts of stuff for hose lines, including a hose crimper kit for professional looking ends. little expensive, but you could do all your ends and your friends, and Ebay it off afterwards. They sell that unit seperately too along with seperate Hose Ferrule\\\\\\\\\\'s.

The hardline option is 3/8" Brake line. This will definately withstand the pressure and not immediately rust out. This is sold at alot of places, when discussing this with JeepinLunatic, The 3/8" line sold at Autozone is coated to help resist rusting (the 1'-5' lengths, it's also available in a roll, but that isn't coated). Advance does not sell line with any coating on it for any size. I'm not sure about Murrays or Carquest, just be sure to ask if it's coated. Each line comes with 2 connectors, and more are also available if you decide to buy a bunch of 5' lengths. If you cut the tube for custom lengths you'll need a Flaring Tool in order for the connectors to work, and is much less expensive than a crimper for air hose.

Separators and Filters

A separator is important for any air system. This is a common piece and available at any parts store that would sell air equipment, it's a common air/water separator. In this particular case the separator will serve 2 functions. 1) to filter out the water that's compressed into the system and 2) to filter out any oil that has escaped into the system from the compressor. The oil isn't much of a problem, but after time it will fill up in the tank, the water is a problem, you do not want your components rusting from the inside out. Some have suggested a return tube to the A/C compressor, I think this is a bad idea. The seperator gets WATER as well as oil, I can't imagine it being good allowing water inside one of these pumps.

The filter is equally important. No one in their right mind would operate one of these systems in an off-road environment with no filtering of the air. There are 2 ways to accomplish this. One way is to use a crankcase breathing filter and either glue (very strong glue) or tape in place on the intake tube. Another route to go is to hook the intake tube into your engine intake tube (after the filter of course and before the throttle body). The latter route I personally feel is the better of the 2.

Valves

It would be really dumb of you not to get a blow-off valve. If something happens and your pump does not shut off or the pressure gets too high, rather than having your tank or other component explode, it will release the pressure at a certain calculated point. They're not expensive and can be mounted virtually anywhere in the system, so long as it comes after the check valve. Get one. Your local machine/tool shop should have one or at least have some idea of where you need to go to get one. Usually an air tank comes with one, but check to be safe.

Check valve. This is what keeps the air you just pumped in from flowing right back out. It's rather important and should be placed right before the manifold for best results. Also available at your local machine/tool shop.

You should probably fit in a release valve somewhere, this is optional if you might want to quickly vent all the air for some reason or another. Not particularly important.

Switches

Pressure switch. This is a pressure activated electric switch. The wiring to connect to your A/C clutch should go through this piece of equipment. Basically once the pressure falls below a certain point, the switch turns on and the A/C clutch engages. When enough air is pumped in and a higher pressure is reached it will shut off, automatically. Try to find one that's adjustable, but if you come across one that fits the pressure range you want, then go for it.

On/Off Master switch. Mount this switch in your cab somewhere. It's just an extra kill switch so that if a problem does develop, you can run your vehicle without screwing up the air system any further than it already is.

Amc78cj7 and Square-D posted this in the pub and I thought it was too awsome to not post in here. They found a site that has some custom printed switches, incliding one for air compressors. The site is www.4x4mods.com/. Online Store > Dash Switches > 40 Series > and pick which one you want.

Tanks

Since the contents are not flammable or explosive you do not need a sophisticated tank. If you were going with something like propane, you'd need a DOT or ASME approved tank (because it's flamable contents and permanently mounted on a vehicle). Speaking of which, a used BBQ propane tank makes an excellent storage tank, just be sure to bleed every last drop of propane out of it. Any size and shape tank is fine so long as it's rated to hold the pressure you plan on running. Kilby Enterprises offers a decent looking tank kit 1.75 Gallon - $55, 2.5 Gallon - $65 (measurements). Also, most tanks will already come equipped with a blow-off valve, check them and be sure just in case.

Gages

Oh yes. The pressure gages. There should be 2 (preferably, but not totally necessary) 1 mounted in the cab area, or somewhere preferable visible in the drivers seat. The other should be around the manifold area somewhere between the check valve and the tank in the engine compartment. Depending on the style you decide on you can get pretty creative in finding ways of mounting it. Due to these being such a necessary safety component, they are available in a massive array of sizes, and shapes

Last edited by Captain Ledd; February 19th, 2006 at 02:28 PM.
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Old February 10th, 2006, 04:31 PM   #5
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Putting everything all together!
a lot of parts can be purchased here or at your local hardware/machine/tool store.

Basic part order.
  • Compressor, either York or Sanden
  • NPT pipe/OEM connectors and air fittings on compressor.
  • Rubber air intake hose leading to an air filter of some sort
  • Rubber air exhaust hose leading to a check valve
  • Hose from check valve to water/oil separator (best to remove it from the system as soon as possible)
  • Hose from separator to manifold.
  • manifold to tank, gages, and other outlet connections

Visual Hose and Air Line Layout: (I'm awesome in MS paint!)


Wiring

Every compressor that I have heard of operates on an electromagnetic clutch. There should be a wire coming from behind the pulley. This the the positive wire and is the wire needed to run through the pressure switch and the master switch. The compressor itself should be grounded (negative). This is usually done by just bolting it to the engine block, but if it isn't, just run a wire from the compressor (not touching anything the positive one touches or a positive surface) and connect it to any metal surface in the engine compartment. A roll of 10 gage wire should prove sufficient.

Wiring Schematic:
COMMING SOON!

DISCLAIMER:
I openly admit I have not yet attempted this, though I am currently working on performing this with the York compressor on my dad's Ranger that I use for picking up parts. Hopefully over summer I can complete this faq. In the meantime, if there is anything else any of you want to add or have questions about or if I've made an error, please post or PM me. Since I will be doing this in the near future, I want this information to be as correct as possible.



http://www.ccicompressor.com/index.aspx
www.pirate4x4.com
http://www.jedi.com/obiwan/jeep/yorkair.html
http://www.kilbyenterprises.com/compressors.htm

Last edited by Captain Ledd; May 1st, 2006 at 08:30 PM.
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Old February 12th, 2006, 01:50 AM   #6
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YES! I have secured a camera for tomorrow.

Also, I added the ID. info for a York tag for those that may have a correct tag and save them the clutch trouble.

While I'm editing all this crap tomorrow, does the gray in the lists make it easier or harder to read? I expected it to be lighter from the drop down menu.
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Old February 12th, 2006, 09:32 PM   #7
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I made a horrible mistake about the copper soft line after I asked around about it today.

IMPORTANT EDIT

DO NOT USE SOFT COPPER LINE. The pressure will work harden the copper and it will become brittle after a while. I did not know this. I don't think the FAQ has been up long enough that anyone bought line yet, if you have, I am deeply sorry. The Black Iron plumbing pipe however, is fine.


Otherwise, I'm still waiting on my friend to get the pics off his camera. More editing later tonight.
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Old February 13th, 2006, 09:06 AM   #8
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Might wana have CC move this to the tech section... otherwise GREAT WRITE-UP !!
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Old February 13th, 2006, 10:07 AM   #9
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I put it here because not much is bolt-on and theres some definate (but not difficult) fabrication. I supopose it technically could be moved to the Tech section since the fab work is simple enough.
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Old February 13th, 2006, 08:11 PM   #10
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Lil' bit better than your drawling..
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Old February 13th, 2006, 08:46 PM   #11
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A misunderstanding. :miff:

Last edited by Captain Ledd; February 14th, 2006 at 01:03 AM.
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Old February 14th, 2006, 12:47 AM   #12
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Whoaa... Sorry man take it easy..
But yours has nothing about wiring.. The other one does... didnt mean to ruffle your feathers..
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Old February 14th, 2006, 01:01 AM   #13
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Yeah, not sure what it was, but when I read it, it just really rubbed me the wrong way.

As for wiring, basically, I hate schematics. I can't seem to work them out. So I'm trying to learn to read schematics and wireing and put up a picture showing exactly where the wires need to go and connect (since wireing is slightly more rigid that the hoses) and what fuses one can wire them into. I'm sure theres quite a few, but I hate wiring... I'll give me dad a call this week or something.

I want to make a picture showing exactly in what order the wires need to be hooked together and what to. And I don't feel comfortable posting that picture with my current knowlege of wireing.

I still find myself editing 3-5 things a day. It's comming along.

Once again, I apologise.
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Old February 14th, 2006, 01:01 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Muddinguy
Lil' bit better than your drawling..

dont be a dick, put your E-penis away
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Old February 14th, 2006, 01:03 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Ledd
Yeah, not sure what it was, but when I read it, it just really rubbed me the wrong way.

As for wiring, basically, I hate schematics. I can't seem to work them out. So I'm trying to learn to read schematics and wireing and put up a picture showing exactly where the wires need to go and connect (since wireing is slightly more rigid that the hoses) and what fuses one can wire them into. I'm sure theres quite a few, but I hate wiring... I'll give me dad a call this week or something.

I want to make a picture showing exactly in what order the wires need to be hooked together and what to. And I don't feel comfortable posting that picture with my current knowlege of wireing.

I still find myself editing 3-5 things a day. It's comming along.

Once again, I apologise.
It's cool.. Understand u just trying to help..


Oh and GMC STFU !!!
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Old February 14th, 2006, 01:09 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Muddinguy
It's cool.. Understand u just trying to help..


Oh and GMC STFU !!!
Maybe if you havent seen your not helping so maybe you should STFU. ledd is postin great info so just stop talking
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Old February 14th, 2006, 07:31 PM   #17
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Added a site with lots of hose stuff and connectors. Also has a tool for making professional looking custom hose lengths.

Also added a section about the York Pulley in the first post.
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Old February 19th, 2006, 03:06 PM   #18
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Added:

3/8" brake line for hard line routing.

Changed the diagram once again to include hardline.

In line oiler for the Sanden Compressors.
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Old February 26th, 2006, 08:32 PM   #19
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Hey Captain, if ya need someone to help ya with the wiring, let me know. Ive had my fair experience with it.
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Old March 20th, 2006, 08:56 PM   #20
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Anything about the twin and Tri Cylinder York Compressors?

Just wondering I have a couple at home and wanted to know how they compare.
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