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Old June 25th, 2012, 06:37 PM   #1
cerial
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Default Looking for a air temp sensor. Help please.

I am looking for a 12 volt/30 amp air temp sensor/relay that I can put in a box and will kick a fan on when the temp is below 90 degrees and shut off once the temp has reached 90 degrees.

Why the heck would I want to mess with this?

I want to run propane and during the winter months with this buggy. During the winter months propane can loose up to 40% of its efficiency due to the temperature drop. That is worth messing around keeping the tanks warm in my book.
I will put 2 10gallon tanks inside a insulated box with the air temp sensor inside. Using a secondary (so it will not vent LP inside the cabin in the event of a line burst) heater core/fan outside the insulated box I can push warm heat into the box heating the tanks after 5-10 minutes of run time. The issue is that I do not want the insulated box to get to hot. Considering it will be roughly 5 square feet with 1" of insulation it will heat up rather quickly.

I am looking for something either programmable or that is set to run up to/shut off at 70-90 degrees. Something that would run off 30 amps, would be ideal and I would use a relay for the fan.

I am coming across tons of 120 volt switches with air conditioners and such but none with a 12 volt application. Know this is a long shot but tossing it out there if anyone knows of anything that would work in this application.

Last edited by cerial; June 25th, 2012 at 06:38 PM. Reason: inside cabin fix
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Old June 25th, 2012, 09:09 PM   #2
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I think you'll have to get a separate temp switch and relay. Just use any temp switch to control the relay, use the relay to drive your high amp draw.

There are literally hundreds of options, here's one google brought up.

http://www.stauffusa.com/customer/st...TempSwitch.pdf
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Old June 25th, 2012, 11:00 PM   #3
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This is what I am looking for. But, in a automotive application where vibration, voltage spikes, and temp dropping below -15 may happen.

http://www.heat-timer.com/enfiles/pr...m-spc-temp.pdf
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Old June 25th, 2012, 11:28 PM   #4
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You are over thinking it. Something along the lines of what fsumotorhead posted is the way to do it, a standard 30A relay and a separate temp switch.
K.I.S.S.
With the simple system, any parts that need replaced later on are cheap and easy to find anywhere. If you go with some fancy control unit like the one you posted, your spending more initially and over complicating it, plus making it harder to diagnose/repair on the trail or away from home.
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Old June 26th, 2012, 08:57 PM   #5
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Would something like this work?

http://www.holley.com/14164NOS.asp
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Old June 27th, 2012, 08:19 AM   #6
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You are still over thinking everything.

Why wouldn't you just run the water heated regulator like everyone else?

As long as you arn't wheeling at 30 below it will work fine.
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Old June 27th, 2012, 08:31 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Muttly View Post
You are still over thinking everything.

Why wouldn't you just run the water heated regulator like everyone else?

As long as you arn't wheeling at 30 below it will work fine.
I am running the water heated regulator. It will work to keep the throttle body from freezing. This will allow me to start up during the cold temps. But, you are still loosing a great deal of fuel efficiency by not having the tanks heated. You loose the efficiency in the tank at your home in the same manner during the winter months. That is why they make tank wraps for your home tank. The propane boils more at 60 then 40. Keeping the tanks warm leads to more pressure and less wasted energy. Getting them to hot leads to a unstable increase in pressure(there is a relief valve for that but I don't want to waste gas) which is why I want them to stay under 100 degrees.

I did consider using tank wraps. But, the cost and hassle of taking them on and off seems like a headache. I am confident I heat the tanks using less voltage and faster using a small heater core/fan.

The idea of running a heated box is to not only keep everything clean from being covered in slush and slurry. But, there is the (small) safety aspect of in the event of a crash the tanks will be somewhat contained during the brief moment of a line fracture before the pressure valve shuts off. I have really over thought the safety aspect of running propane and have designed&redesigned the buggy around the aspect of safety during a crash/roll/etc to make sure the LP does not enter the passenger area.

I see your point on the simplistic approach of a air temp sensor and relay. I did go back to complicating things with that link. Heck when I first thought this up I had a very basic air temp indicator and a manual switch in mind. But, that is like watching your temp gauge to turn on your radiator fan. Eventually you will look down and see your temp at 230 or something because you forgot.

It may have been just me but that link with all the temp sensors looked like they were made for water. If they were for air that's perfect. Hot-90 degree sensor-relay-fan and it is done. Those were made for air? I looked over that page for like a hour and it still seemed like those were made for water.
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Old June 27th, 2012, 08:45 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigWheelBob View Post
Would something like this work?

http://www.holley.com/14164NOS.asp
That might work. I am aiming for a ambient temp of 90 degrees inside the box not a tank temp of 90 degrees. I should have specified that earlier, sorry. But, that sensor is something that may work after I play around with moving it around it inside the box. I will order the sensor and relay off that kit while looking for other sensors that may work in case holly discontinues the product.
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Old June 27th, 2012, 09:00 PM   #9
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Ok after description, If it were mine i'd run a heater core without a fan. I woulld probably use a wabco electronic water control valve to control heat. The water valves are normally closed and a 12v signal to open and use standard 5/8" hose barbs. They advertise them as 2amp draw, but i would still use a relay to drive it off the temp switch.
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Old July 14th, 2012, 10:15 AM   #10
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Try using a thermostat for electric baseboard heaters. most are capable of up to 240v so your protected against voltage spikes. mount the whole unit in the box and use the relays outside the box. For safety, try to find ones that use a mercury switch, that way if there is a small, or any leak inside the box there is no risk of spark
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