What do you do when you cause an oil spill offroad? - Great Lakes 4x4. The largest offroad forum in the Midwest

Go Back   Great Lakes 4x4. The largest offroad forum in the Midwest > 4x4 Land Use > Rules, Regulations, Trail, and ORV Park Chat
GL4x4 Live! GL4x4 Casino

greatlakes4x4.com is the premier Great Lakes 4x4 Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Search
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old June 28th, 2011, 10:45 PM   #1
kb8ymf
Not as old as Whiterhino
 
kb8ymf's Avatar
 
Join Date: 06-01-06
Location: Dryden,Mi.
Posts: 1,105
iTrader: (5)
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Default What do you do when you cause an oil spill offroad?

I don't believe there's anyone on this board who hasn't seen or possibly created an oil spill while offroad, what do you do? Most just walk away like it didn't happen. It's time we all showed a bit of environmental responsibility.

Oil spills from offroad recreationallists has always been a hotbed topic for Environmentalists as it pertains to our recreation. All too often we are blamed, and rightfully so in some cases, for oil spill on land and the subsequent rainbows floating in lakes and rivers near recreational hotspots.

The 21st century brought us a few different variations on cleaning up oil spills. Everyone of these methods involved digging up the contaminated ground and placing it in a bag and carting it out to be disposed of. Well, how many of you know that that bag is classified as a 'Hazardous Material' and CAN NOT be just dumped in your nearest landfil? In fact putting that contaminated bag out in your trash could result in fines in excess of $1000 for improper disposal of a hazardous material.

Just as technology has advanced with our vehicle, so has Oil Spill mitigation. Welcome to the 21st century. And to PeatSorb. A new and suprisingly simple method for eliminating the environmental problems and backlash of cracking your oil pan open on a rock or pealing back a diff cover and dumping your fluid on the ground.

PeatSorb is an Environmentally responsible way to clean up oil spills that keeps you out of harms way so there's no handling the oil and it's great for the environment. There is NO need to pick anything up, NO need to dig up the ground, and NO need to dispose of any hazardous materials after the fact. This fact alone can save you untold fines and court costs.

PeatSorb is simply spread over the oil spill and is allowed to soak up the oil or any hydrocarbon in fact. Stomp on the material and work it into the spill and then WALK AWAY. Thats right, walk away. The PeatSorb will do the rest.

FYI: PeatSorb was used during the Gulf Oil Spill and is used by WEROCK in all their competitions to clean up after themselves. This product has all applicable environmental approvals and is widely recognized as the leading method to clean up oil spills across the country. We're just behind the curve a bit in getting the word out.

More information can be found here on GLFWDA website;

http://www.glfwda.org/showthread.php...ll=1#post63431

And purchased here;

http://www.ufwda.org/store/index.php...products_id=45
Or you can contact me at president (at) ufwda.org

Sincerely,
Jim Mazzola - kb8ymf
President - UFWDA

Last edited by kb8ymf; August 14th, 2011 at 07:17 PM. Reason: Fixed the links
kb8ymf is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old June 29th, 2011, 01:10 PM   #2
tweak
Are we there yet?
 
tweak's Avatar
 
Join Date: 04-20-06
Location: Auburn, Mi
Posts: 1,925
iTrader: (22)
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Default

FYI - when I click the two links above, I get a 404 page not found error.
tweak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 29th, 2011, 01:23 PM   #3
deerebowtie
Unchained
 
deerebowtie's Avatar
 
Join Date: 05-04-09
Location: SE Michigan
Posts: 1,746
iTrader: (23)
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Default

out of sight, out of mind? kick dirt on it and stomp it in the ground. great sales pitch
deerebowtie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 29th, 2011, 01:24 PM   #4
Yetti
Buy a Fiat! Save the UAW!
 
Yetti's Avatar
 
Join Date: 11-05-05
Location: 20 minutes south of Hell...
Posts: 14,384
iTrader: (10)
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Default

yeah your links don't work.

as for clean up kits I have seen this issue many times. most carry rags and junk on board. most don't carry any absorbent due to weight 40# clay is $4. Peat sorb is way more expensive but it weighs 10# for the same size bag at $28-29 per.
Peat sorb won't absorb water or glycol. when you do have a antifreeze spill in the back country is a no brainer. same as in the city dilute with water.

http://www.peatsorb.com/bags.htm
the link above shows how much each bag can absorb
__________________
Yetti
Yetti is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 29th, 2011, 01:38 PM   #5
phittie1100
Senior Member
 
phittie1100's Avatar
 
Join Date: 11-26-05
Location: Burton, MI
Posts: 1,838
iTrader: (15)
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Default

http://www.glfwda.org/showthread.php...light=peatsorb


http://www.ufwda.org/store/index.php...products_id=45

Try these

And if you haven't seen this stuff in action, you need to find Jim at an even and have him do a demo for you.

Water in glass
Trans fluid in glass (red makes a nice contrast)
smoosh it all around
run through a coffee filter
drink the water
__________________
Paul - 2005 Wrangler Unlimited
KD8PAV
phittie1100 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 29th, 2011, 01:46 PM   #6
tweak
Are we there yet?
 
tweak's Avatar
 
Join Date: 04-20-06
Location: Auburn, Mi
Posts: 1,925
iTrader: (22)
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by phittie1100 View Post
And if you haven't seen this stuff in action, you need to find Jim at an even and have him do a demo for you.

Water in glass
Trans fluid in glass (red makes a nice contrast)
smoosh it all around
run through a coffee filter
drink the water

Wow - seeing that would be intresting.
tweak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 10th, 2011, 04:02 PM   #7
treadlightly
Member
 
treadlightly's Avatar
 
Join Date: 09-21-07
Location: SLC/UT
Posts: 63
iTrader: (0)
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Default

Great post!

We always recommend carrying a spill response kit with you, even if that means a shovel and a trash bag to remove contaminated soil from the area at minimum.
treadlightly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 14th, 2011, 07:14 PM   #8
kb8ymf
Not as old as Whiterhino
 
kb8ymf's Avatar
 
Join Date: 06-01-06
Location: Dryden,Mi.
Posts: 1,105
iTrader: (5)
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by treadlightly View Post
Great post!

We always recommend carrying a spill response kit with you, even if that means a shovel and a trash bag to remove contaminated soil from the area at minimum.
Users should recognize that picking up contaminated soil and taking it home and putting it in the weekly trash pick-up may result in $$$$.$$ in fines due the hazardous materials being disponsed of in an unapproved manner.
PeatSorb is really the preferred solution.

jim-kb8ymf


P.S. Fixed broken links

Last edited by kb8ymf; August 14th, 2011 at 07:19 PM.
kb8ymf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 14th, 2011, 07:17 PM   #9
hosejockey4506
Visiting Admin
 
hosejockey4506's Avatar
 
Join Date: 11-04-05
Location: fenton
Posts: 8,786
iTrader: (42)
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kb8ymf View Post
Users should recognize that picking up contaminated soil and taking it home and putting it in the weekly trash pick-up may result in $$$$.$$ in fines due the hazardous materials being disponsed of in an unapproved manner.
PeatSorb is really the preferred solution.

jim-kb8ymf

well then you should let all the fire departments and tow companies in the state know this, as most of them just chuck the used oil dry in the dumpsters after clean up calls.
__________________
one of Michigans 99% er club.
hosejockey4506 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 15th, 2011, 08:27 PM   #11
kb8ymf
Not as old as Whiterhino
 
kb8ymf's Avatar
 
Join Date: 06-01-06
Location: Dryden,Mi.
Posts: 1,105
iTrader: (5)
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hosejockey4506 View Post
well then you should let all the fire departments and tow companies in the state know this, as most of them just chuck the used oil dry in the dumpsters after clean up calls.
Maybe we could get some of the firefighters here to 'educate' their peers into responsible, environmental handling of hazardous materials.
The literature I have shows firefighters in action utilizing this material across the International scene.
PeatSorb CAN be picked up and disposed of in a landfill because it is approved TCLP Non-leachable. Meaning it will stay retained in suspension in the PeatSorb until it bio-degrades naturally. Kitty litter can not, neither can Oil-Dry

Trying to convience even fourwheelers that they should have this material with them trailriding is an uphill battle. I don't think more than 2 dozen GLFWDA members have this with them. (very sad) Even less from the non-organized ranks. Trying to convience municipalities will only happen from the inside OR some news reporter gets wind of irresponsible actions and writes a scathing news report. In either case, compliance with new methods and procedures only occurs nowadays due to external pressure, not from doing what's right. Even more so if it might cost a little more.

jim-kb8ymf
kb8ymf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 15th, 2011, 08:29 PM   #12
kb8ymf
Not as old as Whiterhino
 
kb8ymf's Avatar
 
Join Date: 06-01-06
Location: Dryden,Mi.
Posts: 1,105
iTrader: (5)
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Default

[QUOTE=Renegade II;2750267]

Yep, people just ignoring it. Despite all the proof.

jim-kb8ymf
kb8ymf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 15th, 2011, 08:53 PM   #13
alterego
Senior Member
 
alterego's Avatar
 
Join Date: 03-05-11
Location: Ionia County / Michigan
Posts: 199
iTrader: (0)
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Default

I know everyone is on an environmental green kick. The reality of it is that any one that wants to be completely environmentally conscious needs to remove themselves from society and go live in a cave and wipe your ass with a leaf in lieu of toilet paper.
The point is that given all the trouble that you may go through to clean up 5 quarts of spilled oil from poking a hole in your oil pan in the big scheme of things it is nonexistent.
If some jack ass wants to write a scathing article, it will only gain traction if people who champion the entire green environmental agenda are not willing to admit that more oil is sent out in ink on news papers and then sent to landfills to push the agenda than is spilled in all off road events in history.
Try not to be part of the agenda. Do the best you can, and do what you can.
If you facilitate the carrying of a cleanup kit it will not be long before you are issued one with your ORV permit, at a reasonable fee, plus tax, through a company that has ties to the legislator who flew his private jet to the capital to impose the new rules on you.
alterego is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 15th, 2011, 09:37 PM   #14
kb8ymf
Not as old as Whiterhino
 
kb8ymf's Avatar
 
Join Date: 06-01-06
Location: Dryden,Mi.
Posts: 1,105
iTrader: (5)
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by alterego View Post
I know everyone is on an environmental green kick. The reality of it is that any one that wants to be completely environmentally conscious needs to remove themselves from society and go live in a cave and wipe your ass with a leaf in lieu of toilet paper.
The point is that given all the trouble that you may go through to clean up 5 quarts of spilled oil from poking a hole in your oil pan in the big scheme of things it is nonexistent.
Yep, opening a container and dumping some PeatSorb on the spill is a SHIT LOAD of work. It's about setting an example and doing the right thing.

Quote:
If some jack ass wants to write a scathing article, it will only gain traction if people who champion the entire green environmental agenda are not willing to admit that more oil is sent out in ink on news papers and then sent to landfills to push the agenda than is spilled in all off road events in history.
Try not to be part of the agenda. Do the best you can, and do what you can.
So is carrying a $15.00 container of PeatSorb that much of a hardship?

Quote:
If you facilitate the carrying of a cleanup kit it will not be long before you are issued one with your ORV permit, at a reasonable fee, plus tax, through a company that has ties to the legislator who flew his private jet to the capital to impose the new rules on you.
Or better yet, you can set an example and carry one yourself and set an example instead of you being made an example of.

I really don't understand the mentality of those who don't want to be proactive and do the right thing. Is it really that hard?
Same can be said for those who go wheeling totally unprepared. I see it everywhere I go, North, south, east and west. I see it in every big named event I go to.
Who carries a first aid kit anymore? Or a fire extinguisher? How about extra water? Better yet how about a few simple hand tools like a screw driver and pliers? It never fails that whatever event I'm at the vehicle most likely to break, usually does, and the owner doesn't even have a set of simple tools to fix his junk.

For those who remember October 1999, We need another '3 Days in the Canadian Bush' situation to shake some real sense into what I see as the 'new crop' of fourwheelers that have yet to experience some near life and death situations in order to get them to wake up and open their eyes.

Same can be said for extraction techiniques. It wasn't but a short time ago I had to stop a user for trying to use a strap with hooks on both ends to snatch a Chevy 1 ton buried up to it's axles in a mud bog. It ultimately took a double lined 10,000 winch with a deadman to get it out. Mind you this guy should have known better. Same can be said for vehicles without tow hooks and inferior recovery equipment. Take a trip the Mounds some weekend and tell me how many chains you see pulling people out? It won't be long till someone is seriously hurt out there.

How many of you remember Jonathan Blystra? Not enough I suspect.

I apologize if If sounds like I'm soapboxing but when you've seen as much crap as I have in almost 37 years of wheeling, those who preach and practice the minimalist attutude are the ones who need the most help.

It's not about conforming to the establishments requirements and being 'eco-green', but rather you taking responsibility and doing what's right. Sure trying to live off the grid with zero carbon footprint is not a real possibility but how about just trying to minimize your footprint so you have less of an impact?

I'm be happy to take this offline if you'd like.


Jim-kb8ymf
president@ufwda.org
kb8ymf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old August 21st, 2011, 08:56 PM   #15
treadlightly
Member
 
treadlightly's Avatar
 
Join Date: 09-21-07
Location: SLC/UT
Posts: 63
iTrader: (0)
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kb8ymf View Post
Users should recognize that picking up contaminated soil and taking it home and putting it in the weekly trash pick-up may result in $$$$.$$ in fines due the hazardous materials being disponsed of in an unapproved manner.
PeatSorb is really the preferred solution.

jim-kb8ymf


P.S. Fixed broken links
You are correct. It does need to be disposed of properly, even when taken home.

treadlightly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 14th, 2011, 07:28 PM   #16
Alter Ego
Apprentice Geezer
 
Alter Ego's Avatar
 
Join Date: 06-19-08
Location: Fenton and Whitehall
Posts: 62
iTrader: (0)
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Default

I am one of the people that does carry this stuff with me when I wheel. I also keep a container at home in the garage. I have only used it once on the trail, but I have used it at least 8 times in the garage and in the driveway. When I ran out the first time, I bought a lot more.

Whether you feel it has any significant impact on the environment or not, it does wonders on concrete.
Alter Ego is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 14th, 2011, 07:44 PM   #17
wave_crusher
In the band!
 
Join Date: 01-20-09
Location: Big Rapids, MI
Posts: 5,021
iTrader: (21)
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Default

I actually did in my work van, I used a couple piles on quickcrete, sucked it right up and i just shoveled the gobs up and put them in an empty box
wave_crusher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 4th, 2012, 02:03 PM   #18
cerial
Senior Member
 
cerial's Avatar
 
Join Date: 09-06-08
Location: Caledonia,MI
Posts: 1,751
iTrader: (3)
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Default

I have always carry a 5 gallon bucket and a break down shovel. I have the bucket half full of Peat Sorb. I toss the peat down and then scoop it into the bucket right before everyone is about to go. I have not caused a spill myself yet(probably not wheeling hard enough) But I have used the kit twice on others.

As for disposal I burn the stuff in a wood stove(it burns hot) soil and all. I never like the idea of putting it in a landfill or leaving it out there despite them saying you can.
cerial is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 4th, 2012, 07:11 PM   #19
shawn
Resident HVAC/R Jambi
 
shawn's Avatar
 
Join Date: 11-05-05
Location: Milford/Commerce
Posts: 10,054
iTrader: (24)
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Send a message via Yahoo to shawn
Default

I picked some up during SnoFari. Cheap and easy to pack, carry, and use.
__________________
shawn is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply
Great Lakes 4x4. The largest offroad forum in the Midwest > 4x4 Land Use > Rules, Regulations, Trail, and ORV Park Chat

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:51 AM.


Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright 2000 - 2012, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd. Runs best on HiVelocity Hosting.
Page generated in 0.48223 seconds with 80 queries