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Old December 2nd, 2008, 09:20 AM   #1
mudbillyredneck
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Default Installing a snow plow on a lifted vehicle ? Help or recomendations ?

Hey Plow GURU's

I'm stuck at home this winter in the Lapeer area, ( unemployement sucks ). So I figured I would get a cheep snow plow and put it on my 85 CC F350 to do my driveway this winter.

Here is the problem.....I grew up in the south ( Kansas & souther Colorado ) and have ZERO experiance putting on or fabricating snow plows !!!


My 85 F350 has the TTB ( Dana 50 front axle ) , Fresh balljoints , ect.

So I got a little 7' 6" Fisher Speadcast type of plow ...mostly becouse it was cheep..
Hear is the link to the plow...http://www.greatlakes4x4.com/showthread.php?t=107180


I am going to be installing a 6" lift over the perior of this week, so I was hoping to get pics or peoples advice on how to set the plow up for a lifted Truck...

Any pics would be great...or calculations, or things to consider when installing on a lifted truck would be great .


Thanks for your time.
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Old December 2nd, 2008, 04:32 PM   #2
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as long as you can keep your A arm on the plow carriage close to level when the plow is down on the pavement then it should be fine. just remember to brace the heck out of the bottom rail where its behind the mounting points for the A arm. also since your new to this BEWARE of putting braces in the way of your steering and tierod links. I have seen many wrecks from this so be aware of it when mounting to be sure you have full travel of your steering.
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Old December 2nd, 2008, 08:14 PM   #3
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From what I have read about plowing with lifted trucks is that it wears the blade faster but other than that nothing else was said that made it a bad idea. Since you don't have a job right now it sounds like a good idea to use it to make some money
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Old December 3rd, 2008, 09:11 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yetti View Post
as long as you can keep your A arm on the plow carriage close to level when the plow is down on the pavement then it should be fine. just remember to brace the heck out of the bottom rail where its behind the mounting points for the A arm. also since your new to this BEWARE of putting braces in the way of your steering and tierod links. I have seen many wrecks from this so be aware of it when mounting to be sure you have full travel of your steering.
X2
Also make sure where the bottom rail braces attach to the frame is well thought out to spread the load. I've seen tweaked frame rails from where OEM snowplow mount braces attached. Or you can consider copying an older design that ran a single brace under the axle and to the frame rails by the tranny crossmember. Meyers did that with older fullsize TTB Broncos, which I copied (sort of) when I made my plow mount.

Yetti, got any picts?
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Old December 3rd, 2008, 09:58 AM   #5
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Thanks for the comments guys....I figure I will double up the frame thickness , buy using frame scapes ( salvage yard ) from the same type of truck..that way it follows the contures exactly...and I'm welding 2 similer metals together.


After I double up the truck frame area , where the plow " push plates OR A arms " attatch , I should be ok as far as stress is considered...


I was told about lifted trucks wanting to push the front end of the truck " UP " as opposed to plowing the snow ?

*** Again , any insight or pics of proven combos, are apprieciated. ***

I dont want to re-do anything more than twice....

# 1 Reinforce truck frame ...check !

# 2 Pay attention to steering clearances...check !

# 3 Make plow blade " push plates or A arms" as close to level as possible to the groung being plowed...check !

Last edited by mudbillyredneck; December 3rd, 2008 at 10:03 AM.
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Old December 3rd, 2008, 06:15 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mudbillyredneck View Post
I was told about lifted trucks wanting to push the front end of the truck " UP " as opposed to plowing the snow ?


# 3 Make plow blade " push plates or A arms" as close to level as possible to the groung being plowed...check !
the idea that it pushes the front of the truck up is from guys who don't get the A arm down. the angle makes all the difference. plus make sure you have a good cutting edge. if its worn out the set up height will be wrong.
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Old December 4th, 2008, 10:57 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by Yetti View Post
the idea that it pushes the front of the truck up is from guys who don't get the A arm down. the angle makes all the difference. plus make sure you have a good cutting edge. if its worn out the set up height will be wrong.

Wow...I never thought about the Cutting edge and that the set up was that Precise....


Now I'm worried...
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Old December 4th, 2008, 04:12 PM   #8
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its that big a deal. just some cutting edges come 8" tall and others are 6" tall. depending on what you have if the edge is worn down to 2-3 inches when you set it up then the new one would throw off the set up. if the A arm is really low thats not the issue, its ground clearence at that point.

by the way those cast iron gas cap covers flip like tiddlly winks with a fresh cutting edge. try taking one of those to the middle of your hood at 4:00 in the morning.
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Old December 4th, 2008, 05:37 PM   #9
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This is long but I hope it helps

Check out www.plowsite.com. There is a forum section and also links to most of the plow manufacturers sites. Allot of them have down loadable installation instructions, parts lists etc.. You mite find some for your truck and see how the manufactures mounts were mounted. Most of them work with the OEM's to develop a strong safe setup for each vehicle. I have made and bought mounts You can over engineer mounts pretty quick and add allot of weight you don't need. I have never bent up a truck or the mounts with the factory built mounts.

Trucks I've had
78 F250 7'6" Western. Hand made mounts (over engineered and heavy)
86 Toyota Meyers 2 Meter Very nice factory mounts
85 F250 Meyer 8' Hand made mounts. (Copied factory Western mounts with the push bar that ran under the axle and tied in by trans cross member simple, but goofy looking)
89 F150 Meyer 7'6" Factory mounts ( Easy Mount Classic style. pretty nice and simple easy to copy)
89 F250 Dsl Boss 8'2" Rapid Tach II Factory mounts (The frame mounting was nice and simple very heavy. Attaching the plow was simple but a pain.)

Probably the heaviest mounts I have ever used were for a BOSS 8'2'' V plow I bet the mount kit was 300-400 lbs.This plow kit was specked for gas trucks only because of the weight. Of course I put it on a truck that was already heavy. 89 F250 Dsl. This truck was over weight on the front axle with just the mount kit, almost 4200lbs, and 5000lbs with the plow. It took add a leafs and air bags to hold that thing up. It ate ball-joints like tic-tacs. Rolling weight ready to work for this truck (Plow salt spreader 1000lbs of tractor weights and 1000-2000lbs of salt) was between 10,000-11,000lbs. Not bad on a truck that had a gvw of 8800. Man did it push though.

The simplest and easiest to copy would be the Meyer Easy Mount Classic style. This is the one I've seen copied the most. The Meyer site has allot of pdf docs of their products. Look under the "service& support" tab then "service manuals"

Good Luck
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Old December 4th, 2008, 06:05 PM   #10
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I agree, boss and fisher made monster heavy plows. we had a 9' boss at work to test and the blade assem. without the carriage was 1089 lbs the carriage on the truck was around 350lbs. the V plows are bad, but that thing was horrible
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Old December 4th, 2008, 11:37 PM   #11
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Thanks again for all the details...I knew I did right by reaching out onto GL

All of the info you guys are shairing is great...I will research everything.


Any pics would also be great..all the ones I see for a Ford are kinda goofy looking , And the more I look around hear local ( on stock trucks) I can see why I should pay attention to the steering clearances....


Good looking out you guys...
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Old December 5th, 2008, 07:27 AM   #12
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As Jasper Jpr said the Meyers site has some good info and you can also try one of the many dedicated snowplow websites.

Here is the mount style I was talking about. The diagram is on page 2 in this pdf: http://www.meyerproducts.com/upload/...1-584%20R6.pdf

It comes from the Meyers site, just browse the mount pdfs for ideas:
http://www.meyerproducts.com/service/parts_service.asp


A few other things to consider when making your mount: Will you wheel the truck? Will you leave the hardware on the truck all the time or make it bolt on and off easily? Also remember the higher the truck the lower you have to go with the bottom mount (where the A frame gets pinned on) so the more leverage it will have when you hit something with the blade. Make sure you have it braced well.

When I get a chance Iíll dig up some pictures.
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Old December 5th, 2008, 03:15 PM   #13
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I have also seen where guys have modified the a-frame to raise the pin points so the truck mounts don't have to drop so far. Similar to the pin points on your plow only taller. One time I saw a original type mount that the guy had made a drop extension that pinned into the original holes then dropped down 6"-8" with a new set of holes with some additional bracing so it could be removed. This was on a old style that went in behind the bumper, which were a pain to take on and off. This way he could take the extension on and off quickly.

I remembered another thing last night. Our local car dealers have had take off stuff in the junk before. This is where guys trade trucks and leave the old mounts on and just buy the new mounts for the new truck. The dealers take the old mounts off and scrap them. One dealer we have won't sell a used truck with a cap,non factory hitch, or plow. It all ends up in the junk. You might check the scrap pile at some local dealers. It could get you some of the parts pre made.

I will try and get a couple of pics of the two mount sets I have tonight or tommorrow. One is Dodge and the other is Ford .
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Old December 5th, 2008, 09:35 PM   #14
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Here are some crappy pictures. The pushbar stays on the truck all the time (though it can be unbolted). The cross member behind the tcase stays too. The plow and power unit use hitch pins for quick removal and the bottom of the frame can be unbolted in minutes (7 bolts). I like this setup the best because shock loads are transferred across more of the frame and it will not try to twist the front frame horns down like short kickers will.





I threw in a pict of the Dakota mount as well. That needed re-enforcement hidden behind the bumper to handle the plow.

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Old December 7th, 2008, 06:39 AM   #15
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I was just starting to loose faith, but your advise and pics have gotten me motivated again...

Thanks Jasper jpr & Brods , I think I'm going to something soon

And I am definately going to keep everyones sugestions in mind also...
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Old December 7th, 2008, 07:32 AM   #16
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my neighbors ford 3/4 is just the opposite of your issue. his was so low the guy ran two rails of pipe UNDER the front axle to the trans crossmember to catch the load of the pushbar carriage. its really odd looking.

the one I built for my buddy last year was for a chevy carriage I cut to fit a `77 dodge, then re moded to fit his `95 Dodge. in order to stay clear of the steering on his I welded two huge drop legs to the frame with a pattern of holes to set the push rail too. it works great, but on a half ton its only 6" off the ground with the blade on.
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