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Old August 2nd, 2010, 01:08 PM   #1
ellsworthcj5
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Frack drilling for Natural gas in Michigan health affects

I suggest that anybody who has friends and loved ones that have well water in the state of michigan, be aware of the the health effects of drilling for natural gas.
I have watched a movie called Gasland online and It has left a feeling of urgency in my state. I hunt, fish, and love my fresh water and the state is surrounded by water.

http://stagevu.com/video/oxixzznmpstb Watch the documentary online.


Info about hydro fracking
http://gaslandthemovie.com/whats-fracking/
there are no safe guards in Michigan so no one knows what is going on on each natural gas rig. no monitoring in Michigan department of environment.


Has anyone else seen the movie?
Homeowners in Colorado . can lite their well water on fire because of the natural gas that has seeped into the well water.

Just wanted to inform the caretakers of the woods and waters.
\ Please get involved.

Last edited by ellsworthcj5; August 2nd, 2010 at 01:17 PM.
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Old August 2nd, 2010, 01:18 PM   #2
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I heard about that show on Free Beer & Hot Wings, didn't get a chance to watch it yet, they made it sound frightening.
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Old August 2nd, 2010, 01:24 PM   #3
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So Frightening that it is true!! yep take 1hr and 43 mins to watch it has changed my views and it is urgent to let others in michigan know. what is going on in upper michigan right now!
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Old August 2nd, 2010, 02:43 PM   #4
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It is going on all over the US and I would assume it is being done in the Lower Peninsula as well. It is scary.
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Old August 2nd, 2010, 03:08 PM   #5
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It is going on all over the US and I would assume it is being done in the Lower Peninsula as well. It is scary.

http://www.circleofblue.org/waternew...water-in-play/


Circle of Blue

The aptly named Pioneer natural gas well, near Lake City in Missaukee County’s Pioneer Township, is a stack of gauges and metal piping that rises about 7 feet from a bed of crushed stone at the center of a five-acre clearing surrounded by Michigan hardwoods.

The only sound in the clearing is of songbirds hidden in the trees. The sole scent from the straight-as-a-gun-barrel well–drilled and tested last year–is the smell of money, and potentially of trouble.

Earlier this year the Pioneer well’s Canadian owner, the Calgary-based Encana Corporation, announced that during its first 30 days the well produced an average of 2.5 million cubic feet of gas a day, making it for a time the most prolific single source of natural gas in Michigan. Production has since dropped back to 800,000 cubic feet per day, said state officials, though that is still a prodigious amount for a Michigan gas well.

“The industry’s response to the first well drilled to test this formation has been overwhelming,” said Tom Wellman, Manager of the Mineral and Land Management Section of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment.

A Gas Frenzy
How overwhelming? In early May the natural gas industry saluted the import of those numbers by spending $178 million at a lease sale of nearly 120,000 acres of state-owned minerals in 22 Michigan counties. That was more than seven times the previous record for a state lease sale, and nearly equal to the $190 million Michigan has earned, in total, since it began auctioning oil and gas leases in 1929. In October, Michigan is poised to auction mineral leases on 500,000 more acres, and the natural gas industry is poised, say executives, to spend a lot of money again.

Michigan’s leasing frenzy, touched off by the promising results from a single Missaukee County well, is part of a global rush to tap the Earth’s deep gas-bearing shales for a fuel that burns much cleaner than coal or oil. Spurred by advancing technology, developers penetrate geologic layers miles beneath the surface, and then pump water mixed with chemicals into the space at such high pressure that the rock fractures, releasing the gas.

“There is a concern about the volume of water used,” said Fitch. ”While drilling and use of water is a one time deal for each site, it requires a lot of water. DNRE looks at the effect of water withdrawal on immediate surroundings, if it’s near a wetland or lake or adjacent public water supplies. ” They make sure the activity is not depleting the aquifer at that site. But they do not look at cumulative effects of water withdrawals, the watershed-scale effects of withdrawals.
The Frack
Deep shale gas reserves were left untouched until recently, when a combination of factors came together – the pressure for domestic gas production, cheap alternatives to conventional gas and oil, 3-D seismic technology and the advancement of hydraulic fracturing drilling techniques. Hydraulic fracturing has been used in Michigan since the 1990’s in the Antrim Shale. However the massive hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling used to produce the deep shale gas reserves is different than the hydraulic fracturing for the Antrim Shale. The hydraulic fracturing of the Antrim involves a vertical drill to depths of 1,000 to 2,500 feet with smaller volumes of water pumped into the ground fracturing an area not far from the well bore. The deep shale gas drilling uses horizontal drilling to fracture a larger area with millions of gallons of water down to depths of 10,000 feet.

Big Play State
Northern Michigan is no stranger to big plays in oil and gas development. In the 1970s energy producers drilled thousands of wells into the Niagaran formation 5,000 feet below the surface along a narrow band that extended from Manistee County along the coast of Lake Michigan inland through Montmorency County. It was the largest oil and gas drilling zone on the continent until development opened on Alaska’s North Slope. In the 1990s, developers drilled thousands more wells in the Antrim Shale formation that were about 1,000 to 1,200 feet deep. The companies built an infrastructure of 9,700 well pads, thousands of miles of pipeline and roads, hundreds of compressing stations, and a number of big processing plants that produced considerable damage to streams and forests, but also yielded billions of dollars worth of natural gas.

Pioneer, the township where the well is located, is part of a rural farmland landscape known for its corn, dairy livestock, and Christmas tree farms, as well as a recreational inland lake popular with fishers and boaters in Lake City. The massive hydraulic fracturing of the Pioneer well required 5.5 million gallons of water. Some of the water was supplied by a freshwater aquifer at the site, while another portion was hauled to the site by trucks, said Joel Fox, a representative for Petoskey Exploration, Inc., the company that organized the drilling of the well for Encana, which they evenutally contracted out to Superior Gas.

The Collingwood Shale could be the source of Michigan’s third major hydrocarbon development era of the last 40 years, according to Encana. The company, Canada’s largest natural gas producer, spent an estimated $7 million to $9 million to drill and hydrofrack the well, making it among the most expensive wells ever developed in the state. It bored a hole nearly 10,000 feet deep into the Earth: one of the deepest ever drilled in Michigan.
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Old August 2nd, 2010, 03:10 PM   #6
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It is going on all over the US and I would assume it is being done in the Lower Peninsula as well. It is scary.
You are correct all over the US......
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Old August 2nd, 2010, 04:11 PM   #7
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I say drill.
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Old August 2nd, 2010, 07:13 PM   #8
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There is no higher priority for New York's state and federal legislators than to put the brakes on the idea of opening areas upstate to the controversial form of natural gas drilling called hydraulic fracturing - "fracking," for short.

While the technique has been around for 60 years, critics say the modern version of fracking is unsound, leaving broad swaths of land poisoned and polluted.

"Gasland," an award-winning documentary that airs tonight on HBO (gaslandthemovie.com), shows communities in Pennsylvania, Colorado and elsewhere rife with sick people, animals that have lost their fur, and water so polluted that it actually ignites when a match is held near a kitchen tap.

The problem is a byproduct of modern fracking, which involves shooting millions of gallons of water and a cocktail of extraction chemicals deep underground - on average, 8,000 feet below the surface. The pressurized water and chemicals shake loose natural gas that is then captured and piped away.

Remnants of the chemicals and half of the millions of gallons of water, however, stay behind and begin rising. The tainted water can end up polluting fresh drinking water, which tends to be only 1,000 feet below the surface.

Worst of all, a mysterious process called methane migration can leak combustible gas into the water table as well. That gives some residents in fracking areas tap water that explodes on contact with an open flame.

"It's really quite shocking and strange and, and weirdly kind of thrilling when you see it," the director of "Gasland," Josh Fox, told me when describing the polluted water that turns to fire. "And then all of a sudden it hits: It's really a huge problem."

The film shows people assembling complicated 500-gallon bottled water systems, bemoaning lost property values and complaining of brain lesions, exhaustion and other health issues.

Fox blames the problem on the so-called Halliburton loophole of 2005, provisions in that year's Energy Policy Act that exempted gas drilling companies from the Safe Water Drinking Act of 1974 and allowed them to not disclose the 500-plus chemicals that get shot underground during fracking.

Passage of the law set off a wave of fracking that has reached 34 states. Fox himself became aware of the trend when a gas company offered him $4,000 per acre to let them frack on land he owns near Delaware - an offer that would have brought him $100,000. After studying the process and its effects around the country, Fox rejected the money outright.

His land, like all of upstate New York, sits atop a vast underground deposit of natural gas, the Marcellus Shale, that stretches from New York to West Virginia and could be a veritable Saudi Arabia of natural gas.

Hopes of exploiting these and other major gas reserves are the reason energy magnate T. Boone Pickens made TV ads advocating more extraction of "clean, natural gas" to wean America off of foreign oil. Pickens was persuasive, patriotic and profit-driven. I just hope he plans more commercials to explain the potential of frack-induced pollution.

A growing number of people are already saying: Not so fast. The New York City Department of Environmental Protection has warned that fracking near the upstate watershed could pollute the drinking water for the 16 million people who live in or near our city.

Environmental groups are calling for a moratorium on leasing any land in New York for fracking, and Albany is considering a law imposing a one-year moratorium on fracking. A federal bill would give the federal Environmental Protection Agency the power to regulate fracking.

These are all good starts at what must be a top priority for elected officials: saving New York from environmental horrors that have already shown much of America the false promise of fracking.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/opinions/...#ixzz0vUrmSFvO
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Old August 2nd, 2010, 08:13 PM   #9
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Brace for the drill at any cost crowd posts. Too late they'll be Nimby's when their water turns to crap
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Old August 3rd, 2010, 04:55 PM   #10
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Brace for the drill at any cost crowd posts. Too late they'll be Nimby's when their water turns to crap
I would normally be in the drill at any cost crowd, but this shit has to stop. Once you fukc up the aquifer, you cannot unfuck it. There is no environmental remediation to clean an aquifer that has been fractured like it was hit with a ton of dynamite. I am all about drilling and utilizing our own energy resources. I also like the idea of hoarding them and using up everyone elses first though... I am deep in the energy industry and want cheap natgas, but not at the expense of polluting all water on the planet to get it.
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Old August 13th, 2010, 02:03 PM   #11
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I would normally be in the drill at any cost crowd, but this shit has to stop. Once you fukc up the aquifer, you cannot unfuck it. There is no environmental remediation to clean an aquifer that has been fractured like it was hit with a ton of dynamite. I am all about drilling and utilizing our own energy resources. I also like the idea of hoarding them and using up everyone elses first though... I am deep in the energy industry and want cheap natgas, but not at the expense of polluting all water on the planet to get it.
lol.
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Old August 13th, 2010, 03:52 PM   #12
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I suggest that anybody who has friends and loved ones that have well water in the state of michigan, be aware of the the health effects of drilling for natural gas.
I have watched a movie called Gasland online and It has left a feeling of urgency in my state. I hunt, fish, and love my fresh water and the state is surrounded by water.

http://stagevu.com/video/oxixzznmpstb Watch the documentary online.


Info about hydro fracking
http://gaslandthemovie.com/whats-fracking/
there are no safe guards in Michigan so no one knows what is going on on each natural gas rig. no monitoring in Michigan department of environment.


Has anyone else seen the movie?
Homeowners in Colorado . can lite their well water on fire because of the natural gas that has seeped into the well water.

Just wanted to inform the caretakers of the woods and waters.
\ Please get involved.
Hey, don't put down unsustainable, polluting fuels. Mr. Toes will call you a name or something.
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Old September 7th, 2010, 07:52 PM   #13
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they are drilling big time in the northern lower, talk to the dnr telling you don't the water polluted for the trade off of natural gas.
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Old September 7th, 2010, 09:29 PM   #14
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they are drilling big time in the northern lower, talk to the dnr telling you don't the water polluted for the trade off of natural gas.
yup. tell the dnr to shut down one of the few industry's still doing well in MI. you dont need the jobs or the income.
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Old September 7th, 2010, 09:30 PM   #15
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nor do we need water to drink.
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Old September 7th, 2010, 09:57 PM   #16
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Wait, let me get this straight, DNR cares about my jeep crossing a flowing body of piece of shit polluted water, but they can't do anything about gas companies fucking up my drinking water?!
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Old September 7th, 2010, 10:21 PM   #17
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they are drilling big time in the northern lower, talk to the dnr telling you don't the water polluted for the trade off of natural gas.
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveo View Post
yup. tell the dnr to shut down one of the few industry's still doing well in MI. you dont need the jobs or the income.
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Originally Posted by lets blaze View Post
nor do we need water to drink.
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Originally Posted by howell_jeep View Post
Wait, let me get this straight, DNR cares about my jeep crossing a flowing body of piece of shit polluted water, but they can't do anything about gas companies fucking up my drinking water?!
I'd add to this but I haven't figured out what "don't the water polluted for the trade off of natural gas" means. Could someone translate that into English please?
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Old September 7th, 2010, 10:35 PM   #18
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I'd add to this but I haven't figured out what "don't the water polluted for the trade off of natural gas" means. Could someone translate that into English please?
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Old September 7th, 2010, 10:35 PM   #19
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Hmm..my grandma owns alot of land in Lake City... has natural gas wells, and get lease checks every month.... DRILL BABY DRILL
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Old September 7th, 2010, 10:40 PM   #20
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Hmm..my grandma owns alot of land in Lake City... has natural gas wells, and get lease checks every month.... DRILL BABY DRILL
There is a bumper sticker for that!

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