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Old June 1st, 2010, 04:54 PM   #1
gixxer1397
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Default Lookin to possibly get a welder

Well as the titel states I am thinking about getting a welder , never welded before so it will be a newbie thing for me, i would like to be able to possibly use it to make small stuff like my own control arms, bumpers and little things like that.Price needs to be under 600 and I was looking at these 2 but if there is something more compareable or better for the price please point me in the direction again I HAVE NEVER welded so I would like something a little forgiving.

Lincoln 1

Lincoln 2


Hobart 1

Hobart 2

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Old June 1st, 2010, 09:21 PM   #2
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Check ebay for millermatics. Indiana Oxygen (Indianapolis) use to have a store on there with good prices. Got my 140 from them.
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Old June 1st, 2010, 09:25 PM   #3
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I have the Lincoln HD140 and HD180. Both are nice machines and work great. my $0.02. What one to get mostly depends on what you plan on trying to weld.
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Old June 1st, 2010, 09:30 PM   #4
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the Hobart Handler 140 is a nice welder, especially for the price...its actually a Miller (even says so on the torch)...I have one for the small stuff I do at home, and love it. Anything smaller would be a bit of a waste though...you will need a 20a 110v outlet to run it though, a standard outlet is rated for 15a, and it will trip that repeatedly...
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Old June 1st, 2010, 11:51 PM   #5
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I would stick to the 140amp versions of either brand. You will want the extra heat for links and brackets. have you considered looking for a good used one? You might want to try to get closer to the 180 amp or higher range.
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Old June 2nd, 2010, 09:05 AM   #6
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Chevy as stated before I would be looking to fabricate some of the smaller things for my jeecp such as control arms and bumperslike I said I have never welded anything in my entire life so its going to be a learn as you go experience.

I have looked at the local craigslist but really not sure what to look for when it comes to welders
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Old June 2nd, 2010, 09:17 AM   #7
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the duty cycle is going to piss you off for a cheper welder. and if you plan on welding bumpers and some of the thicker/heavier components you want something that has enough penetration to do so. anything that is underpowered, you risk failure of your parts off road. the weld might look fine but it might only be 25 or 50% penetration. just a FYI.
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Old June 2nd, 2010, 07:04 PM   #8
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Make sure its 240V input power. The 120V machines are NOT enough for general fabrication on 1/8" and thicker plate.
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Old June 2nd, 2010, 08:36 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knaffie View Post
Make sure its 240V input power. The 120V machines are NOT enough for general fabrication on 1/8" and thicker plate.
LOL I have welded 3/8 and 1/4 with my Lincoln 140 and had 2 tractors pull on that hook point and it held up and asked for more. I have also welded brake canister mounts, 1/4" thick, to axle housings, 3/8"+ thick, on Semi trailors with it and have held up to date from a few months ago. All depends on the prep and wire used.

And just because the torch says Miller doesn't make it a Miller welder. Miller makes a roughneck torch that can be put on a lincoln welderso.... There are a few different brands of torches. I like the Bernard center fire guns but those are for the bigger machines.
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Old June 2nd, 2010, 09:16 PM   #10
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Miller owns and manufactures hobart but they are certainly not the same. A lot of the parts are of cheaper quality than on the Miller line. Things like the drive rollers may be plastic or something. With that said some of the parts (like the torch) may be the same and the Hobart line is a good line, especially for the home user like most of us. You should buy whatever brand you want of the highest quality and thats in your budget. Make it hurt your wallet some now and you'll be happy with it for a long, long time.
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Old June 2nd, 2010, 09:23 PM   #11
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Look at the millermatic 211 mvp. I have looked at that one, not purchased yet but for a beginer it seems to be the one
http://www.millerwelds.com/products/...c_211_autoset/
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Old June 2nd, 2010, 09:54 PM   #12
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my Hobart does not have plastic rollers, or anything any different then the Millers I have at work, other then the paint color, that I have ever been able to tell.

Yes, it is a 110 unit, and obviously wont do as much as a 220 unit, but its still easily capable of welding 1/4", and honestly, why would you need anything over that for automotive use? I use the Miller version of the same welder at work on everything up to 1/4", and that is all stuff that takes alot more abuse then a wheeling rig, and never had any problems with anything I've welded. I'm no welder by any means, but speaking from experience, the Hobart 140 will do anything that a person would want to do for automotive use, but you may have to wait on the duty cycle occasionally. If your really that impatient, then get the bigger welder, because you probably wont take the time to prep it right anyway.
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Old June 2nd, 2010, 10:28 PM   #13
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Well I dont mind a little extra elbow grease to properly prep something, I would prefer the 110 over 220 as I will be moving in the near futur and not sure if the next place will have 220 or not. Like I said I am just thinking about it at the moment as I have 600 bucks burning a hole in my pocket and i have always wanted a welder but I could always just put the money into the jeep and get my 8.8 put in as well as a locker LOL
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Old June 2nd, 2010, 11:00 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevyRacer1981 View Post
LOL I have welded 3/8 and 1/4 with my Lincoln 140 and had 2 tractors pull on that hook point and it held up and asked for more. I have also welded brake canister mounts, 1/4" thick, to axle housings, 3/8"+ thick, on Semi trailors with it and have held up to date from a few months ago. All depends on the prep and wire used.
I never said it couldn't be done. But for a new guy just learning to weld, its not a good idea.

Also, the duty cycle on the 120V machines sucks. For another couple hundred, he can have the same machine in a 240V version that has a better output that will him to lay better welds on thicker material.

The decision is a no brainer.

Oh, and by the way, to get full output on your 120V machine, you need something like a 30 amp circuit, which very few plugs are. Otherwise, you'll be blowing breakers constantly.
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Old June 3rd, 2010, 04:06 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knaffie View Post

Oh, and by the way, to get full output on your 120V machine, you need something like a 30 amp circuit, which very few plugs are. Otherwise, you'll be blowing breakers constantly.
20 amp for the Hobart 140, assuming similar sized units will be the same, smaller units will need nothing special...a standard outlet is 15 amps
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Old June 3rd, 2010, 05:00 AM   #16
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You guy can endorse those little 120V machines all you want, but I won't agree. I've used them all (Lincoln, Miller Hobart, import shit), both in the 140 and 180 size. There is NO COMPARISON between the two. A 180 size machine is very versatile and handles most jobs with ease. The 120V machines are barely adequate for most things over 1/8", and it needs to be in the hands of a guy who knows what he's doing, not a beginner.

My parting advice............ You'll never miss an extra couple hundred dollars to buy the larger machine. But if you buy the little one, you're going to be cursing it every time you go to weld something and want to turn it up a little more, and always looking to upgrade. Very few people I know buy the 140 machines and stick with them long term.
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Old June 3rd, 2010, 05:42 PM   #17
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I am also looking at getting a mig/flux core welder. I already have an arc welder so I use that for anything thick that i need to do but i would like a mig for thinner things since the arc welder tends to blow through everything. I would like to get one for 120V just so I can take it places.
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Old June 3rd, 2010, 08:56 PM   #18
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[QUOTE=knaffie;2249034]You guy can endorse those little 120V machines all you want, but I won't agree. I've used them all (Lincoln, Miller Hobart, import shit), both in the 140 and 180 size. There is NO COMPARISON between the two. A 180 size machine is very versatile and handles most jobs with ease. The 120V machines are barely adequate for most things over 1/8", and it needs to be in the hands of a guy who knows what he's doing, not a beginner.QUOTE]

I agree that a beginer shouldn't try welding 3/8 with a 120 machine. but the 180 I have is a 220V machine and is a really nice running machine. I would let a beginer weld with it If I would have had a 220v plug at the time I wouldn't have bought the 120 machine. Versitile is the key. Spend the money now and be happy for a long time after like someone already said.
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Old June 3rd, 2010, 11:16 PM   #19
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I weld with a HF 90 amp welder.....is far from the best (which I have used plenty great welders) but it was 80 bucks and does everything I need it to!

That being said I just fabbed up a 3/16" bumper with it...
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Old June 4th, 2010, 01:11 AM   #20
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look at the millermatic 211 MVP. Ive run a lot of welders and knew that a standard 130/135/140 would just piss me off most of the time, but i wanted a small case that i could take out in the field and run off a generator or use somewhere which 240V wasnt readily available, that coupled with my opinion that if you get a welder that is 240 only, its going to stay in the shop, and if that's the case you might as well just do it big and get a 200+ amp machine. The millermatic 211 MVP was the best choice. It was just about $800 and I purchased it from Purity. It has the same capability as the full cased Millermatic 212, but in the portable small case and a touch less duty cycle IIRC. I have used it all over the place, and had excellent luck with it. The performance difference from 120V to 240V is definitely noticeable, but it welds great either way. I can take it to a good friends farm and weld on his stuff with 120V just fine, then plug it into 240V when its back in my shop. I think without a doubt that it is worth the few extra bucks to get the option to use both, and not outgrow the machine too soon.

like it was said above, most 120V machines get sold and replaced with something bigger eventually. not this one. I'll be keeping this one for a long long time. I would bet that i outgrow my lincoln squarewave 175 tig machine before I outgrow this little 120/240 mig.
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