Pole Barns; help me do some homework on them - Page 2 - Great Lakes 4x4. The largest offroad forum in the Midwest

Go Back   Great Lakes 4x4. The largest offroad forum in the Midwest > General 4x4 Stuff > The Pub
GL4x4 Live! GL4x4 Casino

The Pub A friendly forum where everybody is nice, and will answer any questions you have about life.

greatlakes4x4.com is the premier Great Lakes 4x4 Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Search
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old September 28th, 2013, 10:29 PM   #21
80CJ7
Newbie
 
Join Date: 07-30-13
Location: Lake City, MI
Posts: 23
iTrader: (0)
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Default

I went with a cheap 30x40x12 with no eave overhangs and trusses at 4' (Wish I would have went with eaves to keep the snow away from the building when it slides off the roof), it was only $500 more to go from 10' to 12' side walls so it was a no brainer. Built in 2010, I contracted out the shell and did the rest myself.

Shell: $11,000
Concrete with footings for a future lift: $2100 and a few friends.
Electrical with a 100' run from meter: $2000 with me helping the electrician.
Insulation on sidewalls, 7/16" OSB, and putting 2x6x8 studs between the posts: $1500 approx.
Paid amish to put steel on interior cieling and insulate roof: $1500-$2000?

I was quoted $30,000 from a major pole barn builder for the same project complete from start to finish, the finish work may have been a little nicer, but saved about $10,000 doing it myself.

Last edited by 80CJ7; September 28th, 2013 at 10:34 PM.
80CJ7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old September 29th, 2013, 07:09 AM   #22
03tjsport
Red Dragons!
 
03tjsport's Avatar
 
Join Date: 03-26-11
Location: Fenton, Michigan
Posts: 1,435
iTrader: (23)
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Default

Any idea what the footing requirements for a hoist are? Had one hoist installer tell me 5 inches for existing concrete was ok. Seems a little shady to me. My new to me building has 4" with wire mesh.
03tjsport is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2013, 09:30 AM   #23
DuramaxPowered
Member
 
Join Date: 01-17-10
Location: Monroe, MI
Posts: 32
iTrader: (1)
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbchevy View Post
Hoist ftw
In floor heat, and a hoist FTW.....LOL, thats what I have!!

Sent from my big ass Note2 via tapatalk
DuramaxPowered is online now   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2013, 10:08 AM   #24
Haggar
Covered in mud...
 
Haggar's Avatar
 
Join Date: 11-06-05
Location: Oxford, MI
Posts: 17,793
iTrader: (58)
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 03tjsport View Post
Any idea what the footing requirements for a hoist are? Had one hoist installer tell me 5 inches for existing concrete was ok. Seems a little shady to me. My new to me building has 4" with wire mesh.
4-5 inches for most 9000 lb lifts. I dug a 4*15 foot area to about 10 inches deep.

I am not putting in my hoist just yet, I want the floor space for a few other things. But will probably move my tractor to a different band and install a hoist in the next year or so. I was ready to buy it this summer but I have enjoyed the flexible floor space.

Last edited by Haggar; September 29th, 2013 at 10:34 AM.
Haggar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2013, 05:21 PM   #25
Dave Kerwin
web wheeling, hard.
 
Dave Kerwin's Avatar
 
Join Date: 11-18-05
Location: SE MI
Posts: 6,698
iTrader: (9)
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Default

add floor drains when they pour cement
Dave Kerwin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2013, 10:49 PM   #26
Bones
skillicous
 
Bones's Avatar
 
Join Date: 11-06-05
Location: Dearborn Heights, MI
Posts: 11,560
iTrader: (37)
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Send a message via AIM to Bones
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by concreteguy82 View Post
In floor heat is AWESOME when working on shit in the winter.. Unless you have a lift....
why does a lift make a difference?
__________________
Inviscid Motorsports

Special Thanks and Recommendations to;
Motorcity Machines
Ironman Offroad
Branik Motorsports
Maxxis Tires

Raceline Wheels
PAC Racing Springs
Joint Clutch and Gear
Bones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2013, 10:51 PM   #27
Padilen
Senior Member
 
Padilen's Avatar
 
Join Date: 07-17-12
Location: LeRoy Michigan
Posts: 1,755
iTrader: (0)
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Default

Not laying crawling around on the floor.
Padilen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2013, 10:53 PM   #28
Bones
skillicous
 
Bones's Avatar
 
Join Date: 11-06-05
Location: Dearborn Heights, MI
Posts: 11,560
iTrader: (37)
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Send a message via AIM to Bones
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Padilen View Post
Not laying crawling around on the floor.
in floor heat still is awesome and well worth it even with a hoist. It also help control the moisture better, is more stable, etc
__________________
Inviscid Motorsports

Special Thanks and Recommendations to;
Motorcity Machines
Ironman Offroad
Branik Motorsports
Maxxis Tires

Raceline Wheels
PAC Racing Springs
Joint Clutch and Gear
Bones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2013, 11:13 PM   #29
Padilen
Senior Member
 
Padilen's Avatar
 
Join Date: 07-17-12
Location: LeRoy Michigan
Posts: 1,755
iTrader: (0)
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bones View Post
in floor heat still is awesome and well worth it even with a hoist. It also help control the moisture better, is more stable, etc
I agree. I'd love to have it in both my house and pole barn. Wanted to but things didn't workout.
I found that my outdoor boiler heats my house but doesn't dry the air like forced air heat. And not having a flame in the pole barn is so much saver. It's sad because my boiler could handle heating the floors too.
Padilen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 1st, 2013, 09:00 AM   #30
Haggar
Covered in mud...
 
Haggar's Avatar
 
Join Date: 11-06-05
Location: Oxford, MI
Posts: 17,793
iTrader: (58)
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Kerwin View Post
add floor drains when they pour cement
Many times that is not allowed, since that drain goes outside likely, with garage chemicals... I prefer a flat floor if you are working on it anyway.
Haggar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 1st, 2013, 10:36 AM   #31
gofastbobby
The guy Dale doesn't know
 
gofastbobby's Avatar
 
Join Date: 03-10-07
Location: kalamazoo, mi
Posts: 4,193
iTrader: (2)
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Default

Pick a size that works well for you, then double it. Add a lean-to on one end for storage. that will end up being about half the size you actually need.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlatFender View Post
America! Fuck yeah!
gofastbobby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 7th, 2013, 02:30 PM   #32
howell_jeep
Last Free Man
 
howell_jeep's Avatar
 
Join Date: 02-09-06
Location: Howell Twp, MI 48836
Posts: 10,848
iTrader: (69)
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Default

Well, I called the township today to find out any zoning regulations.

The regulations rule out some of the locations I had in mind. It will create more work for me but should look better in the end.
__________________
I SHOOT RAW!
---

Exercise your rights! Open Carry!
howell_jeep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 7th, 2013, 02:32 PM   #33
howell_jeep
Last Free Man
 
howell_jeep's Avatar
 
Join Date: 02-09-06
Location: Howell Twp, MI 48836
Posts: 10,848
iTrader: (69)
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Default

How does floor heat work? What is the energy source? Can it run on propane or does it have to be a wood boiler of sorts?
__________________
I SHOOT RAW!
---

Exercise your rights! Open Carry!
howell_jeep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 7th, 2013, 02:44 PM   #34
BigBird
Duck Shootin' Wheelerer!!
 
BigBird's Avatar
 
Join Date: 07-17-08
Location: Soo, Ontario
Posts: 5,619
iTrader: (8)
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Default

A couple of my friends from work used natural gas water heaters and a manifold system to heat their garages... Plumb the zones, and wire tie them to the concrete reinforcing mesh before pouring, and voila heat from your floor.
__________________
Cheap Thrills Off Road
BigBird is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 7th, 2013, 02:45 PM   #35
BigBird
Duck Shootin' Wheelerer!!
 
BigBird's Avatar
 
Join Date: 07-17-08
Location: Soo, Ontario
Posts: 5,619
iTrader: (8)
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Haggar View Post
Many times that is not allowed, since that drain goes outside likely, with garage chemicals... I prefer a flat floor if you are working on it anyway.
I have seen some floors with a nice slope toward the garage door when floor drains were not allowed. I have also seen where guys will plumb for floor drains and put a skim of concrete over the drain, that gets cleaned up after final inspection, but I don't recommend that:D
__________________
Cheap Thrills Off Road
BigBird is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 7th, 2013, 08:45 PM   #36
84Scrambler
Senior Member
 
Join Date: 11-07-05
Location: Lansing
Posts: 5,948
iTrader: (8)
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Send a message via AIM to 84Scrambler
Default

My fifth wheel was 12'4" tall. A 14' side wall would have been required to get it in. Of course our barn came with the house when we bought it. It had a 12' door. Unless I let all the air out of the tires or removed the A/C, it was not going to fit.
84Scrambler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 7th, 2013, 09:01 PM   #37
DuramaxPowered
Member
 
Join Date: 01-17-10
Location: Monroe, MI
Posts: 32
iTrader: (1)
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by howell_jeep View Post
How does floor heat work? What is the energy source? Can it run on propane or does it have to be a wood boiler of sorts?
Propane, natural gas, wood burner/boiler are all options. It depends on what you have access to for fuel. I use a Takagi natural gas tankless water heater for mine. Works quietly, and efficiently. If you decide to go this route, I have alot of info to share.

Sent from my big ass Note2 via tapatalk
DuramaxPowered is online now   Reply With Quote
Old October 8th, 2013, 09:30 AM   #38
Haggar
Covered in mud...
 
Haggar's Avatar
 
Join Date: 11-06-05
Location: Oxford, MI
Posts: 17,793
iTrader: (58)
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by howell_jeep View Post
How does floor heat work? What is the energy source? Can it run on propane or does it have to be a wood boiler of sorts?
Google will tell you a lot on the subject. Try searching garagejournal.com as the site.


With in-floor heat, its heating the whole mass of the slab, so very good if you plan to keep the place heated full time. Its not going to quickly raise the temp of the building, but its very even comfortable heat, especially if you are crawling around on the floor.

You would definately want to insulate the foundation, ideally running 2" foam outside of your rat walls (assuming you are doing rat walls and a slab, not a full footer foundation) down a couple feet, and out a couple feet, then foam under the whole slab. You can always put all the foam and tubing in, and then add the boiler/heater/manifolds later, although most of the cost is in the insulation and tubing.

I didn't go that route, because I had X amount of funds to work with, and putting that ~$3000-$4000 into the shell let me get a 20% larger building. And because my barn is intermittant use. I might not be out there for 2 or 3 weeks, so I don't want to heat the barn for that whole time for 5-10 hours a months. If you are someone who spends their evenings out there as the man-cave hang out, then I would be doing the in floor heat.
Haggar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 8th, 2013, 12:42 PM   #39
84Scrambler
Senior Member
 
Join Date: 11-07-05
Location: Lansing
Posts: 5,948
iTrader: (8)
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Send a message via AIM to 84Scrambler
Default

We had the radiant in floor heat in the basement of our old place. I loved it, but it would take a couple days to really be fully up to temp. I would have to think it could take 2-3 days or more to heat a slab in a barn to the point it would be comfortable in winter.
84Scrambler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 8th, 2013, 12:51 PM   #40
Bones
skillicous
 
Bones's Avatar
 
Join Date: 11-06-05
Location: Dearborn Heights, MI
Posts: 11,560
iTrader: (37)
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Send a message via AIM to Bones
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 84Scrambler View Post
I would have to think it could take 2-3 days or more to heat a slab in a barn to the point it would be comfortable in winter.
depends whjat you consider "comfortable". 50 degrees in my house is cold, but 50 degrees in the garage in the winter is comfortable to me if you are moving.

But you are right, once you start adding heat to the concrete slab, you aren't going to notice ANY difference for 12+ hours, so you either have to plan ahead, or just keep it at a descent temp.
__________________
Inviscid Motorsports

Special Thanks and Recommendations to;
Motorcity Machines
Ironman Offroad
Branik Motorsports
Maxxis Tires

Raceline Wheels
PAC Racing Springs
Joint Clutch and Gear
Bones is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply
Great Lakes 4x4. The largest offroad forum in the Midwest > General 4x4 Stuff > The Pub

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:26 PM.


Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright 2000 - 2012, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd. Runs best on HiVelocity Hosting.
Page generated in 0.33617 seconds with 82 queries