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Old November 4th, 2011, 01:38 AM   #1
95Bronco
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Default hydraulic experts, boat application.

I need to figure out how to make one of these myself.


here is a link with more info.
http://www.titantiller.com/


You move the tiller handle, and some how that thing the tiller handle attaches to drives fluid into and out of the cylinder.
The cylinder attaches to the engine.

There is a very small amount of slack in the tiller handle and the pump/bracket with hoses. So you move the handle over 1/4" then it catches, and turns easy as can be.


The now make tiller steer boat engines as high as 250hp because of this power steering setup.

here is a video.
http://www.titantiller.com/video.cfm

THAT VIDEO EXPLAINS HOW IT WORKS.



Anyone with ideas on how to make a home brew system like this??
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Last edited by 95Bronco; November 4th, 2011 at 01:45 AM.
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Old November 5th, 2011, 06:24 PM   #2
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it looks to be basically 2 hydraulic cylinders plumbed togethor (one feeding the other, so no need for a pump, which is also what makes it a closed loop) and has 2 load holding valves (the valves they talk about being operated by the cables. Basically a check ball that keeps oil from flowing in a given direction. The more the oil pushes against the ball, the harder it is pushed into its seat...oil flowing inthe opposite direction easily unseats theball and fows right through)

You move the handle, which does two things:
1)forces the drive cylinder in given direction, forcing oil to flow out of it and into the driven cylinder, which forces it to move in an oposing direction
2)pulls a cable to open the load check on the outlet side of the driven cylinder, allowing the oil to flow out of that cyl...no idea why they didnt use a hydraulic operated load check valve instead, it would mean fewer moving parts to fail and adjust


You may be able to build something like it yourself, if you have access to the correct parts very cheaply (used), have a good understanding of hydraulic principles, at least enough to caculate the flow rates correctly to make sure you get the right parts, and are capable of fabricating the necassary mounts and other pieces.
Even though I dont know what that costs to buy it, I highly doubt you will build something that will work reasonably well for less then the cost of buying it. The hydraulic parts alone will not be cheap, and you arent buying them in bulk for discounted price as this company surely does.
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Old November 8th, 2011, 11:07 AM   #3
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yota Bill View Post
it looks to be basically 2 hydraulic cylinders plumbed togethor (one feeding the other, so no need for a pump, which is also what makes it a closed loop) and has 2 load holding valves (the valves they talk about being operated by the cables. Basically a check ball that keeps oil from flowing in a given direction. The more the oil pushes against the ball, the harder it is pushed into its seat...oil flowing inthe opposite direction easily unseats theball and fows right through)

You move the handle, which does two things:
1)forces the drive cylinder in given direction, forcing oil to flow out of it and into the driven cylinder, which forces it to move in an oposing direction
2)pulls a cable to open the load check on the outlet side of the driven cylinder, allowing the oil to flow out of that cyl...no idea why they didnt use a hydraulic operated load check valve instead, it would mean fewer moving parts to fail and adjust


You may be able to build something like it yourself, if you have access to the correct parts very cheaply (used), have a good understanding of hydraulic principles, at least enough to caculate the flow rates correctly to make sure you get the right parts, and are capable of fabricating the necassary mounts and other pieces.
Even though I dont know what that costs to buy it, I highly doubt you will build something that will work reasonably well for less then the cost of buying it. The hydraulic parts alone will not be cheap, and you arent buying them in bulk for discounted price as this company surely does.




like this
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Old November 10th, 2011, 11:31 PM   #4
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sort of, but what you drew has no way of locking in place, so you would have fun trying to hold the handle in place. Thats what the load hold check valves are for.

In this wonderfully artistic drawing that I have added, you can see basically what those checks would be. Essentially, a check ball with a seat, so that when the oil is pushing the ball into the seat, it closes the path and keeps the oil locked in place. If oil is pushed the other other way, then the ball lifts off of the seat and oil flows through it with little or no restriction. To lock it in both directions, for the sysem you want, then a mechanical system (or a bit more advanced hydraulic system) would need to be used to lift the check valves to start the oil flowing.
Then you have the flow rates to consider, or rather the volume of the seperate chambers. The drive cylinder should be somewhat larger then the driven cylinder, so that you get a mechanical advantage out of it (it has the ability to force more oil out then the driven cylinder can accept) and also the surface area of the piston (which would determine the pressure suplied from the drive cyl. to the driven cyl.) How much mechanical advantage you need is beyond me, as that adds a wole new set of variables.
You will also need some way to bleed the air out of hte system and make sure it is fully filled with oil, though thats not extremely difficult.

As I said before, with the time spent, parts purchased, headache and aggrevation, and trial and error you would go through to get this functioning correctly, it would be cheaper and easier to buy the readily available system.
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Old November 11th, 2011, 07:39 AM   #5
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To clarify, that is only one cylinder.

The shaft above it, slides through the "tilt tube" of the engine.......Basically where a steering cable would connect on a console steer boat.
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